Windows 11?

For me it seemed pretty pointless, to be honest. Windows has been hassling me to upgrade for a while and I did not bother.

They made the right click menu worse, as I understand it, so the first thing you want to do on Windows 11 is to hack the registry and put back the working right-click menu from Windows 10 using an online guide.

Other than that, it requires a TPM device. If you're into conspiracy theories, I'll just say that one of my dudes believes that the TPM is not there because you want it as the consumer, but rather is there to take advantage of you (hence why it is required). What does it even do? Is my dude wrong? Maybe someone else can elaborate.
 
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Just got it on my new machine. I expected jarring changes similar to the Windows 8 shift.

However, it's really a reskin of Windows 10 with some added/removed features. I love the menus and responsiveness so far. It interacts with my M.2 drive at lightspeed. Takes 10 seconds to turn on and off sans any update processing.

Notably, without 3rd party mods, the bottom bar functions a bit differently; more of a Mac approach.

If anyone decides to get it, I highly recommend using this tool for "factory-clean" install: GitHub - builtbybel/LoveWindowsAgain: Fall in love with Windows 11

Major con is I don't like the DRM-style crap they're pulling with software, requiring software ID matching and an always-online connection. It's a bit extreme. Will personally go back to Win 10 if they expand the requirements of this.
 
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When I purchased my gaming laptop a few years ago it came with Windows 10 preinstalled. I later upgraded to Windows 11 and dual-booted my PC with Linux Ubuntu. I recommend Windows 11 over Windows 10 because Windows 11 should be supported longer than Windows 10 will. I have also heard that Windows 11 is considered more secure than Windows 10.
 
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Just got windows 11 on a new pc.

I'll be honest I was sceptical at first. But after getting to try it I must say I LOVE how microsoft managed to take their worst OS ever and, somehow, make it EVEN WORSE.

I recommend Windows 11 over Windows 10 because Windows 11 should be supported longer than Windows 10 will.
If you care about support (why would you though?) just get windows 10 LTSC.
 
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For me it seemed pretty pointless, to be honest. Windows has been hassling me to upgrade for a while and I did not bother.

They made the right click menu worse, as I understand it, so the first thing you want to do on Windows 11 is to hack the registry and put back the working right-click menu from Windows 10 using an online guide.

Other than that, it requires a TPM device. If you're into conspiracy theories, I'll just say that one of my dudes believes that the TPM is not there because you want it as the consumer, but rather is there to take advantage of you (hence why it is required). What does it even do? Is my dude wrong? Maybe someone else can elaborate.
I'm currently using Windows 11 Build 22000 and realized that older WC3 tools like MPQ Master and Jasscraft were unsupported due to the 32-Bit DLLs.
Also, my computer doesn't support the TPM device, despite I upgraded the whole hardware 3 years ago. This is the main reason games such as Valorant isn't playable.
 

Dr Super Good

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I'm currently using Windows 11 Build 22000 and realized that older WC3 tools like MPQ Master and Jasscraft were unsupported due to the 32-Bit DLLs.
Also, my computer doesn't support the TPM device, despite I upgraded the whole hardware 3 years ago. This is the main reason games such as Valorant isn't playable.
Make sure your UEFI is up to date. You will then likely have to enable the virtual TPM within the UEFI as that used to default to off. The instructions to do this vary between motherboard and CPU vendor and use different terminology. This is assuming your CPU model is 3 years old so supports TPM 2.0 and not that you brought a 7 year old CPU and motherboard 3 years ago which does not support TPM 2.0.

After the TPM is enabled you also need to enable secure boot so the entire security device package works correctly. I am not sure how this works for existing operating system installs but basically involves the OS placing a load of keys into the UEFI to verify the integrity of the bootloader.

Valorant is likely using anti-cheat that requires the TPM. The TPM can be used to verify code as well as execute some code securely, features that can improve the effectiveness of the anti-cheat solution. Windows 10 does not require a TPM so on such platforms the use is likely optional. Windows 11 does so in theory all users should have one meaning the use of TPM can be enforced.
 
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Other than that, it requires a TPM device. If you're into conspiracy theories, I'll just say that one of my dudes believes that the TPM is not there because you want it as the consumer, but rather is there to take advantage of you (hence why it is required).
Also, my computer doesn't support the TPM device, despite I upgraded the whole hardware 3 years ago. This is the main reason games such as Valorant isn't playable.
At first I wanted to avoid ranting about Windows 11's requirements, specifically TPM and its friends. Funny that Ravager mentioned Valorant's rootkit anti-cheat actually requiring TPM 2.0 and everything else that goes along with it.
Trusted Computing is the keyword. The first two paragraphs on Wikipedia are quite decent but require elaboration.

Let's go by the principal claims first. TC allows to ensure integrity of the software running on a hardware. In short: the UEFI (BIOS) verifies itself, then verifies that the OS loader program is also signed by a trusted signature (Microsoft). This chain of trust continues until your Windows is up and running. Then it's on Windows to verify the software and drivers that it is running. The goal is to make it impossible to run bad, untrusted programs (malware).
This is not all, of course. The software running can verify that nothing has been changed beneath it. Whether Samsung Knox (disables itself permanently when custom firmware/phone rooted), Google's SafetyNet or whatever MS calls theirs on Windows (begins with "Trusted Boot"). In a "trusted environment" the running software decides whether your computer is safe enough for it to run on.
This means:
  1. You can install another OS only if you can disable SecureBoot / add your own keys to it & sign the new OS' bootloader. Else it won't run. Did the manufacturer allow you to touch these settings? Did you know to ask?
  2. You cannot change your current, pre-installed OS if SecureBoot is engaged:
    1. The OS might not allow you to (lacking root/Administrator rights like on Android)
    2. The OS will detect the tampering and shut down some modules, software will refuse to run etc. (real vulnerabilities will still work though, undetected)
Let's quote a Linux Debian developer and former project lead, SteveMcIntyre, on the page about SecureBoot (edit diff) he wrote:

What is UEFI Secure Boot NOT?​

(1) UEFI Secure Boot is not an attempt by Microsoft to lock Linux out of the PC market here; SB is a security measure to protect against malware during early system boot. Microsoft act as a Certification Authority (CA) for SB, and they will sign programs on behalf of other trusted organisations so that their programs will also run. (2) There are certain identification requirements that organisations have to meet here, and code has to be audited for safety. But these are not too difficult to achieve.

(3) SB is also not meant to lock users out of controlling their own systems.
Users can enrol extra keys into the system, allowing them to sign programs for their own systems. Many SB-enabled systems also allow users to remove the platform-provided keys altogether, forcing the firmware to only trust user-signed binaries.
Underlining is mine.
He's wrong on 3 occasions:
1: Not an attempt to lock out Linux
Except practically no computer/motherboard manufacturer preinstalls Linux distributions' keys into UEFI to enable a seamless installation of anything but Windows, thanks SecureBoot! (bla-bla MS is not to blame here bla-bla). Microsoft is de-facto the only entity who can sign stuff for SecureBoot to accept.
2: There are "certain" requirements that are "not too difficult to achieve"
Such as the most popular open source bootloader, GRUB2 (uses GPLv3 license to avoid Tivoization), cannot ever be signed, because:
4. Code submitted for UEFI signing must not be subject to GPLv3
source

PS: If you read on in the source and questions come up, then please read this discussion.
3: SB is also not meant to lock users out of controlling their own systems.
Except this is exactly why Microsoft requires no GPLv3, because that license mandates to either provide instructions to unlock the device, or if that were otherwise not possible, the private keys to create own trusted signatures.
Microsoft's Windows on ARM systems are locked down HARD by default. I haven't followed it, but to get an idea, here's a Surface RT forum thread where "not meant to lock users out" systems have to be "hacked" with a risk of "bricking" to install custom OS.

After all, the same principles are used in the majority of "branded" hardware you buy today: from computers to phones and "smart" TVs. You are only the user, less of an owner.
Support has ended after 2 years? Please buy a new device. The PR will spin it into being a net positive for the planet somehow.

Valorant is likely using anti-cheat that requires the TPM. The TPM can be used to verify code as well as execute some code securely, features that can improve the effectiveness of the anti-cheat solution. Windows 10 does not require a TPM so on such platforms the use is likely optional. Windows 11 does so in theory all users should have one meaning the use of TPM can be enforced.
He's totally right, this is what it comes down to. That the software can demand the system to be compliant with all these security (lockdown) features. If you modify your system, this software will refuse to run. This is the perfect setup for an anti-cheat: to prevent the user modifying how the game works. Now that you're not permitted to modify the system (even if owner and administrator), that means someone's software is the gatekeeper. The only decision you are allowed to make is to (un)install the software, nothing else.
Soon enough this TPM 2.0 + SecureBoot + Microsoft's Trusted Boot bundle will be required to watch content from streaming services in HD. They already have annoying limitations and invasive DRM to permit you 4K/HDR content. However that's only the beginning. And whatever else they might come up with.

Trusted computing is for providing a trusted environment for someone else's software running on your computer. To make sure that neither the user or nor a virus can alter the execution. Though most of the examples I see today are limiting the actual user and rarely the malware, which will just find another way to get money out of your bank account ("Microsoft Tech Support" phone calls from India)
 
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Level 12
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I do not see the point... People can still setup a camera and video their display running the restricted content.
There needs not be any logic for the copyright holders to demand certain restrictions. For example, Google's Widevine DRM has different "levels". The lowest level is software-only and will permit you to watch 480p/720p on most services. Higher levels, that work only with compatible hardware, will enable you 1080p/4K content.
To demonstrate my point: HDCP. Older HDCP 1.x has been spectacularly broken, you can read about the cryptographics in it online. I bet many devices still kept demanding it (like bluray).
A quick search today revealed that HDCP 2.2 is what Netflix wants today for 4K and 4K/HDR. Thankfully our Chinese brothers and sisters develop liberating devices (even if these devices do not carry it in the name), here's an Amazon review:
I moved some TVs and Roku boxes around in my house and then couldn't view most HDCP-protected content from my Roku on this old 4K TV that I have that does not have any HDCP-compatible HDMI ports. Sending the signal through this box solved the problem for me. Now I can use this TV in a bedroom instead of having to buy a new HDCP 4K TV. Sweet.
Exactly what I predicted above without even researching the issue :peasant-grin: More host-side restrictions is simply the next logical step from my point of view. And Microsoft is here to pave the way with their iron fist. The formal requirement is what will dictate how users' configurations are handled by support, see Valorant's anti-cheat. You use Windows 11 without TPM/what have you? "Unsupported, please enable all these features."

PS: People will always be able to point a camera at the screen as you say. Still, there'll always be the desire to keep tinkering hands away from the digital signal. And so the show restrictions must go on.
PPS: Here's a comment from an older gentleman under a random Youtube video:
I purchased videos in good faith from Netflix Disney and Apple TV for single use and without having any intent to duplicate/copy them only to have them not play through my older projector due to not being HDCP compliant. It's definately an unfair situation.
Rent a new projector and be happy.
 
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Dr Super Good

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A quick search today revealed that HDCP 2.2 is what Netflix wants today for 4K and 4K/HDR. Thankfully our Chinese brothers and sisters develop liberating devices (even if these devices do not carry it in the name), here's an Amazon review:
Assuming you want to watch 4k and HDR... Getting 1080p content is difficult enough with services like BBC Iplayer still stuck offering 740p at best. I do not even own a 4k and HDR compatible television...

These restrictions will likely be relaxed when 4k and HDR is no longer considered a premium luxury that only select content is made in. Currently it is mostly movies that take advantage of these technologies which explains the strict restrictions since the movie industry have generally pushed for content protection, such as the notorious Macrovision. The 4k and HDR versions of films are often sold at premiums or require premium tier subscriptions to view with the 1080p versions being the discount/poor person version.

In other words this is very much a first world problem...
Exactly what I predicted above without even researching the issue :peasant-grin: More host-side restrictions is simply the next logical step from my point of view. And Microsoft is here to pave the way with their iron fist. The formal requirement is what will dictate how users' configurations are handled by support, see Valorant's anti-cheat. You use Windows 11 without TPM/what have you? "Unsupported, please enable all these features."
Part of the blame lies with the cheaters and hackers who develop cheats. No game developer wants to use anti cheat solutions as that makes their games less available and in the case of third party solutions even costs them quite a lot of money. However you also cannot run a competitive game with people cheating, everyone can agree with this since playing against or even with cheaters is not fun.

Casual and single player games are unlikely to adopt such strict measures. Game launching platforms like steam, epic, e.t.c. might if they think it can help prevent people from pirating games, but due to them wanting as big of a market share as possible they might also hold that back until TPMs are so common place that practically everyone has one.
 
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