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Hosting Games: Router and Software Configuration

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Tutorials' started by Ralle, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Ralle

    Ralle

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    Introduction
    While playing certain games behind a router or other types of software / hardware firewalls you sometimes can't host a game because the firewall hardware or software blocks it. To be able to host games, you will have to open / forward the ports that are used by the game. This tutorial describes how to host games in Warcraft III while protected by these firewalls.

    Contents
    Windows Service Pack 1
    Windows Service Pack 2
    Software Firewalls
    Hardware Firewalls
    WarCraft III on Multiple Machines

    Windows Service Pack 1
    If you have Windows Service Pack 1, you also have a built-in firewall that can only be enabled and disabled; this means that you can't configure a single port to open. You can only set firewall to be ON or OFF. In this case, set it to OFF.

    You can find your firewall in "Control Panel/System" or "Control Panel/Windows Firewall"

    After you've found your firewall, click to disable it.

    Windows Service Pack 2
    If you are using Windows Service Pack 2, you will have to open / forward a port for Warcraft III. The standard port used by Warcaft is 6112 which we will forward now.

    You will find the firewall in "Control Panel/Firewall" (it's easier to find it if you change to the classic view)

    The firewall Settings will look like this:
    [​IMG]

    An easy way to allow Warcraft III to access the internet is to just press "Off." This method is not recommended because it decreases your computer's overall security level.

    The preferred way is to open only one port, thus making the system its most secure. This works for both Warcraft III and Warcraft III Frozen Throne:
    Click "Exceptions"
    Click "Add Port"
    Set the name to whatever you want, I would just call it Warcraft III
    Set the Port Number to 6112
    Set it to UDP

    You can also configure your system so that only one selected file will be allowed access through the firewall, this is easily done with the file war3.exe or war3x.exe:
    Click "Exceptions"
    Click "Add Program"
    Click "Browse" and locate the war3.exe (Warcraft III) or war3x.exe (Frozen Throne)

    Software Firewalls
    You might also have a software firewall separate from any Service Packs. These programs could be:
    Zone Alarm,
    Sygate Personal Firewall,
    Norton Internet Security,
    Norman Internet Security,
    Panda Internet Security,
    McAffee, (I tried with this one, but I couldn't get Warcraft III to work)
    etc..

    These programs will be configured differently. Normally a popup window will appear if Warcraft III wants to access the internet. After clicking yes, it will (hopefully) have full access.

    Hardware Firewalls
    Many normal networks also have a Router / Firewall. A router is a separate piece of hardware that allows more than one computer to access the internet with only one IP. This means that if some external computer wants to connect to one computer on your network, the router must have a port defined for the individual computer.

    This is where we will need to set a port for Warcraft III to connect properly to remote computers when hosting a game.

    Many different kinds of hardware firewalls exist: all are configured differently. I can't set up your firewall for you because you are (hopefully) the only one who can access it.

    To access your firewall, you will have to select "Start/Control Panel/Network Connections/" and right-click Properties on your local connection. Here you will find a list of information:
    [​IMG]
    The red marked field is your computer's IP
    The blue marked field is your router's IP

    When accessing your router, you will have to use the "router's IP" from above. In my case it's 192.168.1.1
    Open your web browser, enter the IP of the router, and press enter.
    Now you will see the login screen for your router, enter your login password and log in.
    If you don't know your password, you may be able to find it at the readily available Default Router Password List

    When you are logged in, search for either port forwarding or virtual server, here is where you will need to make some changes.

    After accessing the forwarding option, you will have to configure your settings like this:
    [tr][td]Public Port:[/td][td]6112[/td][/tr][tr][td]Private Port:[/td][td]6112[/td][/tr][tr][td]TCP:[/td][td]YES[/td][/tr][tr][td]UDP:[/td][td]NO[/td][/tr][tr][td]IP:[/td][td]192.168.1.101[/td][/tr]

    The IP should be the IP of your local machine (the above marked with red)

    Sometimes you can also set a value called "start port" and "end port", just set both to 6112.

    If you need more help, try visiting portforward.com for further information.

    WarCraft on Multiple Machines
    If you have two or more computers, you will have to change the port in "OPTIONS" in WarCraft III to two different numbers:
    6112
    6113
    6114
    You can continue doing this for thousands of numbers.

    In your router's access settings you will then have to add more ports: set them from 6112 and up. You will also have to find the IP's of the different computers.

    [tr][td]Public Port:[/td][td]6112[/td][/tr][tr][td]Private Port:[/td][td]6112[/td][/tr][tr][td]TCP:[/td][td]YES[/td][/tr][tr][td]UDP:[/td][td]NO[/td][/tr][tr][td]IP:[/td][td]192.168.1.101[/td][/tr]


    [tr][td]Public Port:[/td][td]6113[/td][/tr][tr][td]Private Port:[/td][td]6113[/td][/tr][tr][td]TCP:[/td][td]YES[/td][/tr][tr][td]UDP:[/td][td]NO[/td][/tr][tr][td]IP:[/td][td]192.168.1.102[/td][/tr]


    [tr][td]Public Port:[/td][td]6114[/td][/tr][tr][td]Private Port:[/td][td]6114[/td][/tr][tr][td]TCP:[/td][td]YES[/td][/tr][tr][td]UDP:[/td][td]NO[/td][/tr][tr][td]IP:[/td][td]192.168.1.103[/td][/tr]


    Back to top
    The End
    I hope this tutorial was helpful to you and that you now can host games on bnet like all the other gamehosters ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 6, 2007
  2. thorlar

    thorlar

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    Could you update this?(Windows 7,Windows 10) After all it was pretty useful :thumbs_up:
     
  3. Dr Super Good

    Dr Super Good

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    No one hosts WC3 anymore. It is all done by robots.

    WC3 uses TCP?!

    It is not possible to host on many budget internet connections today. This is because they use carrier-grade NAT so it is not possible to forward the ports.

    I have no idea how WC3 and IPv6 interact. As a rough guess it probably does not support it but if they programmed it generically maybe it can.
     
  4. thorlar

    thorlar

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    Well,I host on (ro)bots daily,but when they go down,I still want to play...(although it is rare for them to temporarily shutdown)

    I'm also pretty sure it uses UDP since desyncs....

    Really thanks on that useful info,although I really want to try, if it somehow can be done,so I quess google is the way to go
     
  5. Dr Super Good

    Dr Super Good

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    Practically nothing ever uses UDP. TCP is just so much more easy to use and manageable than UDP. Also I know it uses TCP as that is the sort of port forward one has to do at the router.
     
  6. thorlar

    thorlar

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    Hmmmm.... for years I thought it was using UDP,even though its rare af...

    Thanks for the knowledge :thumbs_up: