Human Kingdoms

Which is your favorite Human Kingdom and why you like it?


  • Total voters
    10

deepstrasz

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They are nations. Not all of them are kingdoms. Depends what timeline you're referring to (+WoW included or not).

For instance Kul Tiras is lead by lord admiral Daelin Proudmoore.
Gilneas is ruled by Genn Greymane which doesn't have a title, basically, ruler.
Dalaran is a magocratic nation lead by the a conclave of wizards.
Alterac is lead by a lord Perenolde.
Stormwind (kingdom) is basically Azeroth which was softly retconned later (Warcraft III) as being the planet while also keeping the nation Azeroth on map and in the manual. Since Warcraft II it is lead by regent lord Anduin Lothar. In WoW, well, Varian and then Anduin Wrynn as kings.

Stromgarde and Lordaeron are kingdoms.

So, if I had to choose from a favourite kingdom it'd be Azeroth. As for the nation, it'd be Dalaran.
But multivoting is not possible, so none :p
 
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deepstrasz

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I see what you did there.

maxresdefault.jpg
 
Level 4
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I voted for Lordaeron because it all in Wc3 started from there. Arthas and his battle against bandits, Orcs, then Undeads.... Then corruption, killing father, destroying kingdom, elves in Lordaeron tileset as well... Too much action, never boring :cgrin:
Yeeep!
So Lordaeron means a lot to you haha
Basically your whole experience started with this realm ... how cool! A pity that soon our main character had to corrupt himself and betray his own homeland and family. So many fun times playing with him and suddenly ... BOOM !!!

Speaking of Lordaeron, I know that this kingdom was based on any medieval feudal kingdom, but specifically I have been noticing certain similarities between Lordaeron and the Holy Roman Empire. For example, the vegetation of Lordaeron resembles the vegetation of the region of Gaul and Germania. I also noticed the double-headed eagle on the crest, the knights in the WCII have ornate horns on their helm, much like the iconic style of the Teutonic Knights. But ... it's just nonsense of my head really haha

What do you think?
 
Level 24
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My fav would be the kingdom of Gilneas, the gothic architecture and the eerie lovecraftian and steampunk elements depicted on the hearthstone games are really awesome, and King Greymane, a king who doesn't use a crown, is an interesting character, without mention the worgen curse that flows on their veins.
 
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@ClariceGonzalesBR Oh what I think... I basically agree with you. That kingdom is definitively based on mediavel age with frams, castles, knights, footmans, kings... While dwarves with guns and such suits more primitive cityscape (by primitive I mean modernized city since there are villages and castles otherwice, so those streets, parks and street lights look kinda above its time). Also ,,vegetation" here in Lordaeron is just grass, rocks and pines. Thats all. Those pines are common in almost whole Europe. We have them too. Logically, in Wc3 they usually have just one tree per tileset to make tileset amd map more unique especially when add certain unit set and race, ti circle whole ,,feeling" about that place. Night elves for example are into ,,magical forest", those Orcs fight in barrens, combination of savannas and wild west environment, naga are in tropical area and such... So since pines are common mark of temperate zones, and medieval kingdoms are mostly synonyms for pre colonial kingdoms,this is why Lordaeran look like this
 
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Interesting. I wonder if it was meant that way or it's just the result of texture mirroring.
images.jpeg

I think the intention was really that. Although the image mirroring is a bit blurred, you can see that it is a two-headed eagle.

Interesting the Lordaeron symbol is also a two-headed eagle, besides the L.
This eagle was widely used by medieval nations. Its origin is Byzantine and its meaning is variable. The most accepted is that it is the domain of both Western and Eastern lands.

Ah, may I ask you a question?

Is Kul Tiras a nation coming from Lordaeron? Are they the same nation except that Kul Tiras is ruled by an admiral?
I was looking a little at the town of Theramore in the Rexxar campaign and noticed Lordaeron flags on the map.

Do they have a connection or is it just generic?
 

deepstrasz

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Is Kul Tiras a nation coming from Lordaeron? Are they the same nation except that Kul Tiras is ruled by an admiral?
It's not specified.
Note that there are not specific Kul Tiras units in TfT, only Daelin.
I don't know about WoW.

Lol, the consistency in the Warcraft II manual is stifling.
proudmoore admiral of a kingdom.png
kul tiras.png


So, Kul Tiras is a kingdom lead by a lord admiral :D?
Yeah, the eagle is there but it has one head.

The banners of the other nations:
Azeroth
banner01.png

Lordaeron. As you can see, no eagle.
banner02.png

Stromgarde has an eagle too or a pheonix?
banner03.png

Gilneas
banner04.png

Dalaran
banner05.png

Alterac has an eagle or a raven?
banner06.png
 
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Level 24
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View attachment 337929
I think the intention was really that. Although the image mirroring is a bit blurred, you can see that it is a two-headed eagle.

Interesting the Lordaeron symbol is also a two-headed eagle, besides the L.
This eagle was widely used by medieval nations. Its origin is Byzantine and its meaning is variable. The most accepted is that it is the domain of both Western and Eastern lands.

Ah, may I ask you a question?

Is Kul Tiras a nation coming from Lordaeron? Are they the same nation except that Kul Tiras is ruled by an admiral?
I was looking a little at the town of Theramore in the Rexxar campaign and noticed Lordaeron flags on the map.

Do they have a connection or is it just generic?
They come from Gilneas, since Kul'tiras is closer to that kingdom, and since the new lore, kul'tirans are descendants of the early gilneans that established themselves on those lands.
 

deepstrasz

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Weirdly enough, Terenas is mentioned as Lord in the Warcraft II briefings while in the manual as King :D
Maybe they intended for the one in the briefings to be Arthas xD?

EDIT: also, Llane's son is name Varien in the Warcraft II manual and Varian in the RoC manual.
 
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Level 4
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Weirdly enough, Terenas is mentioned as Lord in the Warcraft II briefings while in the manual as King :D
Maybe they intended for the one in the briefings to be Arthas xD?

EDIT: also, Llane's son is name Varien in the Warcraft II manual and Varian in the RoC manual.

In Warcraft 1 Manual, "God" is cited in a Cleric spell description.

"As dispensers of peace and understanding to the people, the need to keep a clear perspective is a vital one. This ability has developed from that need, and therefore allows the caster to see in an all encompassing fashion, as God does. His vision extends to all corners of the land, and his view is omnipotent. The power of this divination is limited, for when one strives to see the world as God does, the human mind can only partake of a meager portion before it is forever blinded by the clarity of that sight."

I wonder if the people of Azeroth really have a god and he is based on the Christian God or if God was removed from the Lore so as not to cause religious intrigue or better develop fantasy without the idea of a god of humans.

In the concept arts of Warcraft I, we see that human troops have crosses on their shields and tabards. Detail we never saw later.
 

deepstrasz

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In Warcraft 1 Manual, "God" is cited in a Cleric spell description.
Yes and so are archangels :)
I wonder if the people of Azeroth really have a god and he is based on the Christian God or if God was removed from the Lore so as not to cause religious intrigue or better develop fantasy without the idea of a god of humans.
Churches and crosses in lore were removed in Warcraft III, only the Northshire Abbey is mentioned in the manual. Only crosses you see is a modified one on the Paladin model's book and there are also doodad gravestones with having crosses of sorts. Also, the Ankh of Reincarnation item icon and the FX of the Reincarnation spell.
God has been replace by the Light and there's no mention of God or angels in Warcraft II or III.
But in WoW the Order of the Silver Hand still has a cross on their banner, covered by a upward palm (Abhayamudra - Wikipedia - which can indicate Buddhism since is has similarities with Christianity). Sometimes there's a fist instead. Not sure if it's before, after or at the same time.
So, even if they tried to reduce the Christianity being in our faces, it's still there because Northshire Abbey and everything that came out of it, Clerics and Paladins are obviously inspired by medieval Christianity.

On similarities between Christianity and Buddhism.
For instance the Karana Mudra
depositphotos_162440332-stock-photo-detail-of-buddha-statue-with.jpg

The same posture found in Christian icons:
Jesus-Christ-Open-Book-Hand-Painted-Orthodox-Icon-2-2.jpg

The halo/nimbus of enlightenment/divinity:
Gandhara_Buddha_%28tnm%29.jpeg
Ushakov_Nerukotvorniy.jpg
Also incorporated on crosses by Celts:
Ringed cross - Wikipedia
Celtic cross - Wikipedia

In the concept arts of Warcraft I, we see that human troops have crosses on their shields and tabards. Detail we never saw later.
Not necessarily though. It could be something older than that since human footmen have viking horns
Sun cross - Wikipedia
 
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