Full Menus and Buttons Toturial

Level 8
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
308
Know this toturial is extracted from blizzard's support folder, which alike 85% of people dont know it.

This toturial will explain what each button does, and each object editor jobs and stuff.
This toturial was improved by me as well as sorted.


1)Map Creation and Settings
Creating a New Map
You can create a new map by selecting the option New in the File menu. You will then be given several options from which to choose:
Width - Determine the length of your map along its x-axis. This number can be any whole number from 16 to 256.
Height - Determine the length of your map along its y-axis. This number can be any whole number from 16 to 256.
Playable Area - The area of your map that is actually playable. These values cannot be adjusted directly; they are determined by the width and height, minus area reserved for boundary.
Size Description - The relative size of your map. This can be: tiny, small, medium, large, huge, and epic.
Tileset - This field allows you to modify what your initial tileset will be when you create your map.
Initial Tile - This field tells you what tile will cover your map's terrain when you begin. The default tile can be changed by clicking on any tile in the tileset you have chosen.
Initial Cliff Level - Set the starting level of your map's terrain. For example if your map starts at cliff level 14 (the highest), the terrain cannot be raised any higher. If you start at cliff level 0, the terrain cannot be lowered.
Initial Water Level - The initial water level of your map. If a water level is selected, your map will start covered by that level of water. Use the three buttons below this heading to set the default water level to None, Shallow Water, or Deep Water.
Random height field - Checking this option automatically raises and lowers the terrain, creating an uneven surface on your map when you begin.


Melee Versus Non-melee
A melee map in Warcraft III is one where the only player-owned units you place are starting locations, and there are no custom triggers, sounds, or units. The techtree properties and upgrade properties of your map have not been altered; if they have, your map is a non-melee map. You can, however, place doodads and neutral units. You can tell immediately if your map is a melee map or not by checking the lower right of the status bar.

Pathable and Unbuildable
Two concepts that you must understand when making both campaign and melee maps are pathability and buildability.

Pathability refers to what areas units can move through and around. For instance the Orc Hero Tauren Chieftain is a much larger unit than an Orc Peon and therefore requires more area than a Peon to move through and around objects and terrain. Peons can path through places that a Tauren Chieftain could not. You can see pathing by hitting the p key or by selecting Pathing from the View menu.

Buildability refers to where units and buildings can be placed. There are certain tiles where buildings may not be placed, such as rock tiles. However, other units may be placed there. For instance an uprooted Night Elf building may be placed on a rock tileset, but a rooted Night Elf building cannot.

Adjusting Your Map Properties
Your map's properties can be displayed and modified by selecting any of the first four options under the Scenario menu: Map Description, Map Size and Camera Bounds, Loading Screen, and Prologue Screen.
Map Description

Name - Here you can name your map.
Suggested Players - List what types of games and configurations your map works best with (e.g., 2v2, 2v2v2v2).
Description - Here you can tell players what to expect from your map.
Author - Give your name or your handle.
Expansion Required - Lists all expansion only features that are being used in your map.
Reset Map Description to Defaults - This option resets all four text fields to their defaults.

Map Options

Hide minimap in preview screens - This prevents players from looking at an open map in the preview screens. When this option is checked, the minimap cannot be seen when in chat or when it is selected to create a multiplayer or single-player game.
Masked areas are partially visible - Areas in which the player hasn't traveled will be somewhat translucent to that player, rather than completely opaque (Black Mask), though far darker than the Fog of War. This option is referred to as Dark Mask.
Show water waves on cliff shores - Where water meets sharply defined land, waves will be visible.
Show water waves on rolling shores - Where water meets smoothly sloping land, waves will be visible.
Use Item Classification System - Enables the usage of the Item Classification System. Enabling causes items to be sorted into the following categories: Permanent, Charged, Power Up, Artifact, Purchasable, Campaign and Miscellaneous.
Use Terrain Fog - Enables fog properties. Different fog styles, shapes, density and color can be set.
Use Global Weather - Enables weather conditions over the entire map.
Custom Sound Environment - Enables the modification of generally all 3D sounds played during the game.
Custom Light Environment - Enables lighting conditions over the entire map.
Reset Options to Defaults - This option resets all four text fields to their defaults.

Map Size and Camera Bounds

This section allows you to alter your map's size and camera bounds. In the center of the dialog box you will see a minimap. The sets of arrows that surround the minimap alter the map from the side they are on. The numbers next to each arrow under the headings Camera and Map denote the size of your map's viewable area and the total size of your map in small grid squares.

The two checkboxes, Modify Map Bounds and Modify Camera Bounds, let you modify the total size of your map and the size of your map's viewable area, respectively. If neither box is checked, you cannot click on any of the arrows. If only one option is checked, then you will only modify that.

The two statistics to the right of the checkboxes, Playable and Full, give the playable area of your map and the actual size of your map in medium grid squares.

Loading Screen

Use Default Screen - Use the default loading screen.
Use Campaign Screen - Use a campaign screen you have chosen for your loading screen.
Use Imported File - Allows imported files to be used as loading screens. Selecting Use Campaign Screen or this option will make the following fields available:
Loading Screen Title - The title displayed on your loading screen.
Loading Screen Subtitle - The subtitle displayed on your loading screen.
Loading Screen Text - Area for adding more text describing your map.
Reset Loading Screen to Defaults - Reset the loading screen to its default settings.
Prologue Screen

Use Default Screen - Use the default "Melee" prologue screen
Use Campaign Screen - Allows you to use a campaign screen you have chosen for your prologue screen. Selecting this option will also make the following fields available: Prologue Screen Title, Prologue Screen Subtitle, and Prologue Screen Text.
Prologue Screen Title - The title displayed on your prologue screen.
Prologue Screen Subtitle - The subtitle displayed on your prologue screen.
Prologue Screen Text - Area for adding more text describing your map.
Reset Prologue Screen to Defaults - Reset the prologue screen to its default settings.


Player Properties
Player Name - Here you can set player names.
Color - This is each player's color; these colors cannot be modified or reassigned.
Race - Choose the race of each player.
Controller - This option lets you set whether a player is computer controlled, user controlled, neutral, or rescuable. A rescuable unit will change its allegiance to the first player that comes into contact with it.
Fixed Start Location - This option forces the editor to give a player a certain starting location.
Reset Players to Defaults - Reset the players to their default settings.


Ally Priorities Properties
This section allows you to modify the precedence with which the game sets who will start at what starting location. It allows you to place teams together. For instance if your map is designed to be played by two versus two, you would want the two players of each team to start in locations next to one another. To ensure this, put same-force players into each other's High Priority section, and move all other players to the None section. The Low Priority category is evaluated after the High Priority category, but before the None category. To modify these properties, first check the box Modify Ally Priorities.

Force Properties
A force is similar to a team. You can put several players on the same force and make them start allied, with allied victory on, and even make the players share vision. To modify your player's forces first check the Use Custom Forces box. You can make people on a force have the following designations: Allied, Allied Victory, Share Vision, Share Unit Control, Share Adv. Unit Control.
Enabling Fixed Player Settings has several effects. It disables a player's ability to modify the race and color chosen in Player Properties. It disables a player's ability to alter any alliance, vision, and share unit settings. It also guarantees that the user will be assigned the first player slot when using the Test Map feature.

Techtree Properties
This section allows you modify what players can build what units. If there is a check next to a unit's name under the heading Available, that unit can be built. If the check box is empty, that unit cannot be constructed or trained. To alter the default techtree settings, you must first check the Use Custom Techtree box. (Please note that modifying this check box makes your map a non-melee map.)

Ability Properties
This allows you to prevent a player or players from using certain individual skills. For instance, you can allow a player to build Sorceresses, but then disallow the skills Slow, Invisibility, or Polymorph. To alter these properties, you must check the Use Custom Abilities box. (Please note that modifying this checkbox makes your map a non-melee map.)

Upgrade Properties
This section allows you to decide the state of a player's research at the beginning of the game. If an upgrade is listed as Researched for some player, then that player will start the game with that upgrade already researched. If an upgrade is listed as Unavailable, it cannot be researched. If it is Available, it can be researched. To alter these properties, you must first check the Use Custom Upgrades box. (Please note that modifying this checkbox makes your map a non-melee map.)




2)World Editor Features and Navigation


Navigating Your Map
There are many ways to navigate your map. You can move up and down or left and right by using the scrollbars or the arrow keys on your keyboard. You can also move around by right-clicking on your map and dragging. Alternatively, you can change positions by left-clicking the minimap and dragging.

Due to the three-dimensional nature of Warcraft III maps, you now have the option to zoom in on and rotate your map. You can zoom in or out by holding down the shift key and right-clicking and dragging on your map. You can rotate your map by holding down the Control key and right-clicking and dragging on your map. If you press the C key to lock the game camera, you can then use the game's conventions for zooming in and rotating.

Previewer
The previewer is the box on the left side of your screen that allows you to see each unit or doodad you select before you place it on the map. You can rotate and zoom in or out relative to each unit or doodad by using the arrows buttons located underneath the previewer. You can also see each animation under the various lighting options available by clicking on the arrows next to the associated time of day.

With the Doodad Palette you can see all variations of a doodad in the previewer, and you can decide which variation you would like to place, provided you do not have Place Random Variation option checked. Once you've chosen a doodad to place in your map, you can see any available variations or animations of the selected doodad by clicking the up and down arrows next to the word Variation or the word Animation on the left side of the editor. If you do not have Random Rotation depressed, you can rotate the doodad you place by rotating it in the previewer.

Using the Unit Palette, you can see all the available animations for a selected unit by clicking the up and down arrows next to the word Animation on the left side of the editor.

Brush List
The brush list is an alternative to the palettes. However, it only allows you to select the terrain, units, and doodads associated with the tileset you chose when you first created the map. For instance, if you choose Lordaeron Summer as your tileset, only the units and doodads that fall under that tileset will be available in the brush list. The brush list also doesn't offer some of the other features of the palettes, such as brush size, and random rotation.

Status Bar
The status bar is beneath the horizontal scrollbar at the bottom of the editor window; it provides you with information about what you are currently doing. It is divided into four sections from left to right.

The first section displays the current position in (X, Y, Z) coordinates of the cursor, and the current cliff level of the terrain the cursor is above.

The second section displays what brush is currently being used. If you are modifying terrain, it will tell you your brush size, shape, and what type of brush you are using. If you are modifying doodads or units, the status bar will tell you what doodad or unit you are placing. If you are modifying regions, the status bar will simply say "Regions." This section will also tell you if you have the selection brush active.

The third section shows what, if anything, is currently selected on your map. If you have an object selected, it tells you the object's name, the order in which it was placed on the map (e.g., Paladin 0000 was the first unit placed on the map; this number only applies to units), its four-letter code (if the object is a unit or doodad), its owner (if it is a unit), and its level (if it is a Hero, a creep, or a critter).

The fourth section tells you what game time the editor is currently displaying. This time can be a set, unchanging time, but its default setting follows the normal day/night cycle. This section also shows whether the map you are working on is a melee map.

Minimap
The minimap displays the terrain, units, doodads, and regions placed on your map from an overhead perspective.

Show Neutral Building Icons - Enable this option to view the neutral buildings on the map as icons.
Show Show Creep Camp Icons - Enable this option to view the location of creep camps.
View Game Minimap - Enable this option to view the minimap without the border.


Preferences
The preferences section can be accessed through the File menu.
General

Undo Limit - Enable this option to limit the number of actions taken in the editor that can be undone. This limit can be useful for systems with memory constraints.
Invert Mouse - Change what direction the map scrolls when you right-click and drag along it.
Autosave - Save your map automatically at set intervals.
Show Tooltips - Display tooltips in the editor.
Show verbose tips in unit palettes - Display verbose tooltips in the editor. Show Tooltips must be enabled if you want to use this feature.
Lock visibility for active palette - When this option is checked, you cannot modify the visibility status (via the View menu or through hotkeys) of the objects associated with the current in-focus palette. For example, you could not modify doodad visibility while the Doodad Palette is open.
Create a new map on start-up - Create a new map every time you start the World Editor.
Automatically create new palette windows - With this option selected, every time you hit a palette hotkey, a new palette will be created.
Automatically create new unknown variables while pasting trigger data - With this option selected, variables will automatically be created when triggers are pasted that contain unknown variables. Note: This does not include the "Set Variable" trigger as this trigger can reference all variable types.
Reset General Preferences to Defaults - Reset all general preferences to their default states.
Visual
Fixed Time of Day - Enable this option to have the editor always display maps at a certain time of day. You can then choose this time of day.
Sky display - Choose what sky is displayed when you turn on Sky in the View menu.
Tool Palette Button Size - Choose the size of the buttons on the palettes.
Large Grid Color - Choose the color of the large (512 x 512) grid boxes.
Medium Grid Color - Choose the color of the medium (128 x 128) grid boxes.
Small Grid Color - Choose the color of the small (32 x 32) grid boxes.
Terrain Wireframe Color - Choose the color displayed when the terrain is displayed as a wireframe.
Use Terrain Cursor - Choose the color displayed when the terrain is placed, or choose no cursor at all.
Reset Visual Preferences to Defaults - Reset all general preferences to their default states.
Text Colors
This section allows you to change the colors displayed associated with triggers in the Trigger Editor and Object Editor, making it easier to find and read them. Double-clicking on a trigger category in the list will display that trigger's associated color. You can select one a preset color from the list or select create a custom color by selecting the option Custom, then entering numbers for red, green, and blue values.
Reset Text Color Preferences to Defaults - Reset all text color preferences to their default states.
Test Map
Difficulty Level - Change map's difficulty level when Test Map is used.
Player Profile - Change the profile name created when Test Map is used.
Difficulty Level - Change the difficulty level maps use when using the Test Map feature.
Fixed Random Seed - Makes all random numbers generated in the game the same.
Copied Map File - Change the location of the test map file created when using the Test Map feature.
Reset Text Map Preferences to Defaults - Reset all text color preferences to their default states.
Video
Model Detail - Change the detail of the models in the editor.
Animation Quality - Change the quality of the animations in the editor.
Texture Quality - Change the quality of the texture in the editor.
Particles - Change the detail of particle effects in the editor.
Lights - Change the detail of light effects in the editor.
Match Video Options from Warcraft III - Set the video options in the editor to match the options in Warcraft III.
Reset Video Preferences to Defaults - Reset all video preferences to their default states.
Sound
Sound Volume - Modify the volume of sound played in the Sound Editor.
UI Effects Volume - Modify the volume for user interface sound effects.
Music Volume - Modify the volume of music played in the Sound Editor.
Reset Sound Preferences to Defaults - Reset all text color preferences to their default states.

3)World Editor Menus


File
New (Ctrl + N) - Create a new map.
Open (Ctrl + O) - Open a map.
Close (Ctrl + W) - Close an open map.
Save (Ctrl + S) - Save an open map.
Save As - Save an open map. This option allows you to change the map's name.
Calculate Shadows and Save - Create a shadow map, improving the shadows on your map in the game and in the editor.
Export Script - Export a World Editor script.
Export Minimap - Export a minimap image.
Export Strings - Export strings.
Import Strings - Import strings.
Preferences - Open the editor preferences.
Configure Controls - Edit World Editor shortcuts.
Test Map (Ctrl + F9) - Run the map in the game in order to test it.


Edit
Undo (Ctrl + Z) - Undo the last action done.
Redo (Ctrl + Y) - Redo the last action undone.
Cut (Ctrl + X) - Remove and copy the currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Copy (Ctrl + C) - Copy the currently selected doodads, units, cameras, regions, or terrain.
Paste (Ctrl + V) - Paste the last doodads, units, cameras, regions, or terrain that you copied or cut.
Mirror Paste Vertically (Ctrl + numpad +) - Flip terrain, doodads, units, cameras, or regions being pasted vertically.
Mirror Paste Horizontally (Ctrl + numpad -) - Flip terrain, doodads, units, cameras, or regions being pasted horizontally.
Rotate Paste 90 CW (Ctrl + numpad *) - Rotate terrain, doodads, units, cameras, or regions being pasted 90 degrees clockwise.
Rotate Paste 90 CCW (Ctrl + numpad /) - Rotate terrain, doodads, units, cameras, or regions being pasted 90 degrees counter clockwise.
Clear (Delete) - Delete the currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Select All (Ctrl + A) - Select all the doodads, units, cameras, regions, or terrain on the map.
Nudge Selection Move Left (Numkey 4) - Move left currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Right (Numkey 6) - Move right currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Up (Numkey 8) - Move up currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Down (Numkey 2) - Move down currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Left + Up (Numkey 7) - Move left and up currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Left + Down (Numkey 1) - Move left and down currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Right + Up (Numkey 9) - Move right and up currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Move Right + Down (Numkey 3) - Move right and down currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Nudge Selection Rotate Left (/) - Rotate left currently selected doodads, units, or cameras.
Nudge Selection Rotate Right (*) - Rotate right currently selected doodads, units, or cameras.
Nudge Selection Scale Up (+) - Scale up currently selected doodads.
Nudge Selection Scale Down (-) - Scale down currently selected doodads.
Nudge Selection Scale Up XY (Home) - Scale up currently selected doodads on the XY axis only.
Nudge Selection Scale Down XY (End) - Scale down currently selected doodads on the XY axis only.
Nudge Selection Scale Up Z (PgUp) - Scale up currently selected doodads on the Z axis only.
Nudge Selection Scale Down Z (PgDown) - Scale down currently selected doodads on the Z axis only. View Selection in Object Manager (F1) - View currently selected units, doodads, regions or cameras in the Object Manager.
View Selection in Object Editor (Ctrl + F1) - View currently selected units or doodads in the Object Manager.
View Selection in Tool Palette (Ctrl+P) - View currently selected units or doodads in the Tool Palette.
Edit Properties (Enter) - Edit the properties of the currently selected doodads, units, cameras, or regions.
Move Up in List (Ctrl + PgUp) - Move currently selected region or camera up in the Tool Palette list.
Move Down in List (Ctrl + PgDown) - Move currently selected region or camera down in the Tool Palette list.
Select Next in List (Ctrl + Tab) - Move currently selected region or camera up in the Tool Palette list.
Select Previous in List (Ctrl + Shift + Tab) - Move currently selected region or camera up in the Tool Palette list.
Mirror Selection Vertically - Flip selected terrain vertically.
Mirror Selection Horizontally - Flip selected terrain horizontally. Rotate Selection 180- Rotate selected terrain 180 degrees. Rotate Selection 90 CW - Rotate selected terrain 90 degrees clockwise. Selection must be a square.
Rotate Selection 90 CCW - Rotate selected terrain 90 degrees counter clockwise. Selection must be a square.


View
Terrain (Ctrl + T) - Display terrain in one of three possible ways: textured, wireframe, or hidden. The wireframe option will show vertex heights, but no textures. Hidden will completely black out the terrain in the editor.
Doodads (Ctrl + D) - Toggle the display of doodads.
Units (Ctrl + U) - Toggle the display of units.
Unit Info Display (I) - Enabling this option causes certain units to be portrayed differently on the map. A unit whose target acquisition range is set to camp rather than normal will now appear dark blue in the editor. If a unit has been set to drop an item when it dies, a white circle will now appear around that unit in the editor.
Water (W) - Toggle the display of water.
Blight (H) - Toggle the display of blight.
Shadows (S) - Toggle the display of shadows.
Lighting (L) - Toggle the light cast on the world.
Weather (E) - Toggle the display of weather.
Sky (K) - Toggle the display of the sky backdrop.
Grid (G) - Toggle between four different sized terrain grids. The first option is to show no grid in the editor; this is the default setting. The second option displays 512x512 unit squares; the third option, 128x128; and the fourth option, 32x32.
Camera Bounds (B) - Toggle display of the camera boundary lines on the map. The camera bounds represent the center point of a camera moved to the extremes of the map.
Pathing - Ground (P) - Toggle the pathing map overlay on or off. A white overlay indicates unpathable, unflyable, and unbuildable terrain. A pink overlay shows unpathable and unbuildable terrain. A blue overlay indicates unbuildable terrain.
Pathing - Naval (N) - Toggle the naval pathing map overlay on or off. A red overlay indicates terrain that is unpathable to naval units.
Regions (Ctrl + R) - Toggle the display of regions. Regions are automatically displayed when the regions layer is selected.
Camera Objects (Ctrl + M) - Toggle the display of camera objects from the Camera Palette on or off. Camera objects are automatically displayed when the camera layer is selected.
Lock to Game Camera (C) - Pan the editor camera to match the in-game settings, and lock the editor camera in that position.
Letterbox Mode (X) - Enable this option to change the map view to the same aspect ratio of the game without the UI pane. The main purpose of letterbox mode is to allow mapmakers to see precisely what will be viewable in the game.
Snap to Game Camera (Ctrl + Shift + C) - Change the camera settings to match the in-game settings, but do not lock them. Note that clicking the middle mouse button also performs this action.


Layer
Terrain (T) - Change an open palette to the Terrain Palette. This option allows you to modify terrain.
Doodads (D) - Change an open palette to the Doodad Palette. This option allows you to modify doodads.
Units (U) - Change an open palette to the Unit Palette. This option allows you to modify units.
Regions (R) - Change an open palette to the Region Palette. This option allows you to modify regions.
Cameras (M) - Change an open palette to the Camera Palette. This option allows you modify cameras.

Scenario
Map Description - Modify the map's name, description, suggested number of players, and author as well as a listing of the expansion features used.
Map Options - Modify the maps environmental settings and toggle use of item classification.
Map Size and Camera Bounds - Modify the map size and camera bounds.
Loading Screen - Modify the current map's loading screen.
Player Properties - Set player names, races, and controllers. You may also decide here whether players have fixed start locations.
Ally Priorities Properties - Modify starting location priorities.
Force Properties - Set the starting player forces.
Techtree Properties - Set what units can be created for each player.
Ability Properties - Set what abilities can be researched, as well as what abilities are already researched, for each player.
Upgrade Properties - Set what upgrades can be researched, as well as what upgrades are already researched, for each player.


Tools
Selection Brush (Space) - Allow selection of objects depending on what the current layer is.
Brush Size - Change the current brush size. This option only applies to the doodads and terrain layers.
Brush Shape - Change the brush shape from circle to square. This option only applies to the doodads and terrain layers.
Randomly Rotate Doodads - Toggle random rotation of doodads.
Randomly Scale Doodads - Toggle random scaling of doodads. There are four settings for this random scaling: symmetric, asymmetric, asymmetric Z-axis only, and asymmetric XY-axis only.

Advanced
Modify Tileset - Allows you to switch tilesets or modify the current tileset.
Random Groups - Allows you to set up random groups of creep that will spawn in chosen locations.
Item Tables - Manages all the item drops for the current map.
Gameplay Constants - Allows you to modify of gameplay constants.
Game Interface - Allows you to modify of the game interface.
Reset Height Field - Resets the terrain to its default height, if you don't check the Random box. If you do check the box, then this resets the terrain to its default height plus or minus some slight height variations.
Adjust Cliff Levels - Increases or Decreases the height of all terrain and objects by a selected amount.
Replace Tile - Allows you to replace all placed tiles of one type with another.
Replace Cliff Type - Allows you to replace placed cliff types with another.
Replace Doodads - Allows you to replace doodads of one type with another. This can be done to all doodads, or only selected doodads.
View Entire Map - Sets the camera so that all of the map can be viewed at once.
Reset Texture Variations - Redraws all ground textures with the default distribution of randomly chosen texture variations.
Enforce Water Height Limits - Enforces normal rules of water height. If this is unchecked, you can create strange effects with levitating water; however, you might also end up with some nasty graphical glitches. Use this option with caution.
Enforce Camera Bounds - Enforces the camera bounds which are the blue lines just inside of the map border. If this is unchecked, camera objects can be moved beyond the camera bounds.

Module

Terrain Editor (F3) - Change the focus to the Terrain Editor.
Trigger Editor (F4) - Change the focus to the Trigger Editor.
Sound Editor (F6) - Change the focus to the Sound Editor.
Object Editor (F7) - Change the focus to the Object Editor.
Campaign Editor (F5) - Change the focus to the Campaign Editor.
AI Editor (F8) - Change the focus to the AI Editor.
Object Manager (F8) - Manages and cross-references all doodads, units, items, regions, and triggers currently in your map.
Import Manager (F8) - Manages imported files.


Window

New Palette - Open up a new palette window.
Show Palettes (A) - Toggle whether or not you can see all the currently open palettes.
Toolbar - Toggle display of the toolbar.
Minimap - Toggle display of the minimap.
Previewer - Toggle display of the minimap.
Brush List - Toggle display of the Brush List.
(Map List) - Switch between currently open maps.


Help

Warcraft III World Editor Help - Display help about the World Editor.
License Agreement - Display the End User License Agreement.
About Warcraft III World Editor - Display version number and copyright information.
 
Level 8
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
308
4)
a)The Terrain Editor
The Terrain Editor is the main module of the World Editor. Here you can design and modify your terrain, as well as place units and doodads.

The Terrain Palette
To modify terrain, open your Terrain Palette by hitting the T key or by using the Window menu and choosing New Palette, then Terrain. Once the Terrain Palette opens, you have four categories of tools you can use.

The first section on the Terrain Palette is the Apply Texture section. By clicking on any of the tiles, you can select that tile and place it on your map. You may even place Blight and boundary textures. Boundary is a special tile over which no unit can cross. It is similar in function to the blackness that surrounds your map. Blight is the disease that spreads over the ground near Undead buildings. The option Place Random Variation (on the previewer) allows the editor to place a random tile variation from the currently selected tile type, rather than placing only the tile variation you can see in the previewer.

Second is the Apply Cliff section. This section allows you to add and remove cliffs, shallow water, deep water, and ramps. You can also change what cliff you are using. You may increase or decrease the area modified by changing brush size.

The third section, the Apply Height section, has the following options:
Round - This tool allows you to make rounded hills. Holding down Shift and left-clicking with this tool enabled allows you to create rounded valleys.
Plateau - This tool allows you to create perfectly flat surfaces on rounded hills and rounded valleys.
Noise - This tool creates an uneven broken surface.
Smooth - This tool allows you to smooth out uneven surfaces.
The final section displays what brush shape and size you have selected and allows you to change the current brush size.

Modifying Your Tileset
You can modify the tileset you have chosen or even create a custom tileset by selecting the option Modify Tileset under the Tools - Advanced menu.

To create a custom tileset, you must first know that that tiles have an attribute called a texture page. Some tiles take up one texture page, while others with more variations take up two. You are limited to having a maximum of twelve texture pages used in a given tileset. All of the tilesets you can customize take up twelve texture pages at the start. Therefore, to add a new tile to a tileset, you must first remove enough tiles from that tileset to free enough texture pages so that you can fit your new tile in. If your new tile takes up two texture pages, you can remove two tiles that take up one texture page each, or you can remove one tile that takes up two texture pages. This will free the two texture pages you need to fit your new tile in. You cannot move or remove tiles that are marked with a red box, however.

The Unit Palette
To place units on your map, simply open a Unit Palette by hitting the U key, or if you have a palette open, you can change that palette to the Unit Palette by left-clicking the down arrow and choosing Unit Palette.

The first menu specific to the Unit Palette is the list of possible unit owners:
Player X - This is a list of Player 1, Player 2, and so forth up to the maximum number of players you have allowed in your map via Player Properties.
Neutral Hostile - A contradiction in terms? Well, neutral hostile units do not care what player you are. They are hostile to all players, including computer-controlled players, but they are not hostile to other neutral hostile units.
Neutral Passive - These are units that will not attack even if attacked. Player units will not attack them unless ordered to; some neutral passive units (like the Goblin Merchant) cannot be attacked at all.
Items - Here you can select items to be placed directly on your map. This is not the place to decide what items your creeps will drop, though; for that, you need the Unit Properties dialog box, which you get by double-clicking a unit you've already placed on the map.
The second menu is the race menu. It allows you to place units of any race, even units that are outside the current player's race, including neutral units.
The third menu is a list of unit subtypes:
Melee - Units that can be found in a normal melee game.
Campaign - Units that are found in campaign maps.
Custom - Units that are created in the Object Editor.


The fourth section is where you find the units.

Player units (Orc, Human, Night Elf, and Undead) are divided into five categories.
Units - These are the non-Hero units available to a race. You will notice that there seem to be two of some units, like the Undead Gargoyle. This unit has two forms; thus, you have two options to place: a Gargoyle in regular form and a Gargoyle in Stone Form.
Buildings - This is a list of all the buildings each race can construct, including player starting locations. Only the rooted versions of Night Elf buildings will fall under this category if the currently selected race is Night Elf.
Heroes - These are the Heroes available to a race.
Uprooted Buildings - This section is specific to the certain races; it includes the uprooted form of all of the selected race's buildings that can be uprooted and moved.
Special - These are the units created specifically for campaigns.

In addition to the aforementioned categories, the neutral units also have two more categories. These units can be further divided into groups based on tileset and level.

Items may have another menu. If the use item classification option is checked in the Scenario - Map Options tab, there will be another menu that divides items into several different categories.

Unit Properties
After placing a unit, you can further modify it. To do this, double-click a unit you have placed, or select the unit and choose Edit Properties in the Edit menu. The following options can be modified for a unit you have placed:
General

Player - This menu allows you to change the ownership of the unit to any player or any of the previously mentioned owners: Player X, Neutral Hostile, or Neutral Passive.
Facing - Here you can change what direction the unit is facing, either by clicking the arrows or entering in numbers manually.
Hit Points - This field allows you to adjust the starting hit points of the selected unit. Please note that this is a percentage, and not the actual number, unlike the mana field.
Mana Points - Units with mana can have their starting mana amount adjusted directly. Please note that this is not a percentage, but the exact number, unlike the hit points field.
Level - Designate a Hero's starting level. This will affect its maximum mana and hit points.
Target Acquisition Range - This sets how far the unit AI will look to acquire targets. This option affects when the unit will attack hostile units who approach it.
Use Default Attributes - Enables a Hero to have different Strength, Agility and Intelligence values.
Abilities - This affects what abilities the unit can have active, provided that the research requirements have been met in the Upgrade Properties menu if the unit is player-owned. You can place points into a Hero's abilities just as you would in a game. Please note that a Hero's ultimate ability will not be modifiable until that Hero is level six, so if, for example, you want a Paladin to start with Resurrection, you must raise his level to at least six.
Inventory - Here you can set what items a Hero will have when that Hero starts the game: simply left-click an inventory slot, and select an item from the window that appears.

Items Dropped

Here you can set what items a unit or building will drop when it is destroyed. This can be done either by creating a custom drop table or from assigning it a drop table from the item table list.

New Set - In order to add an item, you must first create an item set. A set is a group of items that can drop, but are mutually exclusive. Each item in that set will have a chance based on its percentage to drop, but only one of them can drop. If you want a unit to drop more than one item from a unit or building, you must assign it more than one item set.
Delete Set - Delete a set already located on a unit.
New Item - Select a new item to add to a selected item set.
Delete Item - Deletes an item from a selected item set.
Edit Item - Exchange an item in a set with another item, or edit the item's likelihood of dropping.


Random Groups
Random groups are groups of monsters that have a chance to appear in a given area. These groups are similar in essence to the item drop tables, each particular group you set up has a potential to be placed, however they are mutually exclusive, only one set of creep in a group will appear in a specified area. The random set that appears will be chosen at the time the map loads.

To create a Random group, select Random Groups from the Tools - Advanced menu. Then select Add Group to create your first group of monsters. Then select Add Set to create a set of monsters that has a chance to spawn. There is a maximum of ten monsters in each set. You can change the number of monsters that spawn by selecting and changing the number of positions available in each set. Not every position has to be filled, so some groups can have fewer monsters than others. To have multiple sets that can spawn, simply add more sets of monsters.

To use your random groups, place as many random units as you have positions in your group. Next, to use your group, open each random unit's Unit Properties dialog (by double-clicking on each unit), then selecting the Random Unit tab.

On this tab select From Random Group for your Random Unit Type. Then select the random group you just created in the Random Group listing. Then set the position of the monster you want to spawn in this Random Unit's spot.


The Doodad Palette
To place doodads, open the Doodad Palette by hitting the d key or by selecting Doodads from the Layer menu. Doodads are generally non-interactive objects placed on a map for visual appeal. The big exception is the tree doodad; trees are consumable.

Doodads are organized by tileset and by category. The doodad categories are the same for every tileset, but not every tileset has doodads that fall into each category.

Next there are several buttons on the Doodad Palette:
Random Rotation - This changes the doodad to face a random direction when placed.
Random Scale - Symmetric - When this button is pressed, the placed doodad will be of a random size, but it will remain symmetric: all vertices (X, Y, and Z) will be increased by the same amount.
Random Scale - Z only - With this button depressed, the editor will randomly adjust doodads along the Z-axis only (height).
Random Scale - XY only - When you press this button, the editor will scale doodads randomly along the X and Y-axes only.
Place Random Variation - Most doodads will have at least one other variation; with this option selected, the editor will randomly select a variation to be placed.
The last two things on the menu are the list of available doodads and the brush menu.

Doodad Properties
After placing a doodad you can further modify it just like a unit. To do this, double-click on a placed doodad or select Edit Properties from the Edit menu. You have the following options, though not all are available for every doodad.
Variation - Some doodads have multiple variations on the same model, you can select a new variation here.
Rotation - Some doodads can face many multiple directions, though others are quite limited.
Scale (%) - You can modify the scale of the doodad along each vertex (X, Y, Z) by manipulating the various numbers next to each vertex. Not all doodads can be manipulated in all vertices however.
Life (%) - You can modify the starting life of destructible doodads. Even setting them to zero.
Items Dropped - Doodads can be set to drop items upon being destroyed in the same method that units can.


The Camera Palette
The Camera Palette can be found by hitting the M key or by selecting Cameras from the Layer menu. This palette is designed to complement a trigger that uses it. If you do not specify triggers in your script to see the action through your cameras, then the player will never know they exist.

The options available on the Camera Palette are as follows:
Create - Create a new camera, and sets that camera to the exact view of the map you currently have.
The following options do not become available until you have created at least one camera and selected it.
View - View your map from the currently selected camera in the Cameras list.
Set To View - Change the selected camera's perspective to the one from which you currently view the map.
Next on the palette is a list of cameras. You can change a camera's name by right-clicking on it and then selecting Rename; you can also delete or create a copy of a camera through the right-click menu.

Camera Properties
After placing a camera you can modify its placement, name and focus. Below is the list of modifications you can make to a camera's perspective through the selected camera's Camera Properties dialog:
Camera Name - This field allows you to modify a selected camera's name.
Target X - Move a selected camera along the X-axis.
Target Y - Move a selected camera along the Y-axis.
Z Offset - Move a selected camera up and down on the Z-axis (normal).
Rotation - Rotate a selected camera with respect to the Z-axis (normal).
Angle of Attack - Rotate the camera with respect to the ground.
Distance - Modify the camera's distance relative to its target.
Roll - Rotate the camera along its longitudinal axis.
Field of View - Increase or decrease the field of view.
Far Clipping - Increase the length you can see to the horizon line.
Preview Values in Main Window - With this option checked, your perspective will change to that of the camera you are altering when you modify one of the above values.

The Region Palette
Regions, like cameras, need triggers to reference them so that they can be properly used. Otherwise, they will have no effect in the game. They can be used to set off triggers or to delineate areas a trigger will affect. This aspect will be explained in more detail when we discuss the Trigger Editor. There are exceptions to this rule of linking regions with triggers, and they involve weather effects, Way Gates and ambient sounds.

The Region Palette is relatively simple. Clicking on Add will allow you to add a region. The white field below these two buttons contains a list of all the currently placed regions. If you right-click a listed region, you can edit its properties, view it, and delete it.

Region Properties
This dialog box can be reached by double-clicking on a region in the terrain the Terrain Editor or by right-clicking on a region in the Region Palette and selecting Edit Properties. This dialog box has the following options:

The first field allows you to modify your region's name. If you change this field, it will also change the variable name of your region. The variable name is Region_XXX, located underneath the modifiable name field.

The four numeric fields below the region's name field allow you to modify the size of the region by adjusting each of the region's four sides.

The Select Color option allows you to designate that the selected region display with a specific color in the editor. This makes it easier to tell the difference between multiple regions next to each other.

The Weather Effect checkbox allows you to add weather effects through regions. This is the only method available to designers who wish to have weather effects on melee maps. Otherwise triggers must be used, and the map will become a non-melee map.

The Ambient Sound checkbox allows you to add ambient sounds that will play in specified regions. However, these sounds must first be set to variables in the Sound Editor; otherwise, this option will not be able to be set. Please note that if you have placed a weather effect, you do not need to add an ambient sound for that region, as the sound associated with that weather effect will be played automatically.

Way Gates
Way Gates are a special neutral passive unit in the game used in combination with regions. If you place a Way Gate and then open its Unit Properties dialog, you can make that Way Gate transport units to any region on the map by putting a check in the box, Way gate Active and then selecting a region you have placed. If you have not placed a region, you will not be able to check that box; it will be grayed out. If you do not point the Way Gate to a region, it will not be able to transport units.

4)
b)The Trigger Editor
This is the most advanced and powerful portion of the World Editor. The Trigger Editor allows you to take complete control of every aspect of the game. It is a simplified programming language designed to be accessible to novices, but powerful enough to satiate the desires of more advanced users. To open the Trigger Editor, use F4, or choose Trigger Editor from the Module menu.

A trigger is composed of three parts: events, conditions, and actions. A trigger's actions will activate if, when one of its events occurs, its conditions are met.

Events
Events will start the process that may lead to a trigger's firing. After a trigger's event has taken place, its conditions are evaluated, and finally its actions may occur. The default trigger in a map is "Melee Initialization." This trigger's default event is "Map Initialization." Basically this means that the instant the map finishes loading, its actions will occur: the trigger has no conditions that must be met. If you wanted to, you could change this event to "Time - Time Elapsed," then change the number of seconds to ten. The map would then run the "Melee initialization" trigger ten seconds after it had loaded.

Conditions
Conditions are special requirements that must be met for a trigger's actions to occur. A condition must be true for a trigger's actions to run. This way of thinking about conditions can be deceptive because you can have a condition like "False Equal to False"-- a condition which would always be true. The default trigger "Melee Initialization" contains no default conditions; let's add one. Hit Ctrl + D, then select "Game Speed Comparison." The dialog box will then have the blue text, "(Current game speed) Equal to Normal." If you leave the condition as it is and then run the map from the editor, the "Melee Initialization" trigger will run normally, assuming you have not changed any other parts of the trigger from their default values. However, if you change "Normal" to "Fastest," the "Melee Initialization" trigger will not run from the editor. This is because the editor sets the game speed to "Normal" automatically when you run maps from it. The condition would be evaluated as "Normal speed equal to Fastest speed," a condition which is not true.

Some of the differences between conditions and events are that conditions are only evaluated if the event of the trigger that they fall under has occurred. Also, although a trigger can have multiple events, only one event need occur for a trigger's action to happen, whereas all conditions must be true simultaneously for the trigger's actions to occur.

The only things a trigger really needs are actions. (Well, in point of fact, this is not exactly true. However, a trigger with no actions has no effect on the game and, therefore, no real point in the script.) It is worth pointing out, though, that triggers do not need conditions or events in order for their actions to be carried out in the game. Triggers can be run from other triggers using the action "Trigger - Run (Ignoring Conditions)," which will run any trigger's actions, regardless of its conditions or events or lack thereof.

Actions
Actions are the results of a trigger. These can be anything from panning the camera to a specific unit, as in a cinematic, or having one unit attack another. Actions allow the designer to have complete control of what occurs in the game.

Creating a Trigger
To open the Trigger Editor, hit F4 or select Trigger Editor from the Module menu.

Before you create a trigger, you must have a category to place that trigger in. Create a new category by selecting Category from the New menu. You will see the category you just created in the tree listing on the left. Categories have file icons. You can name a category either by typing its name immediately after you create the new category, or by selecting the category, hitting F2, and typing in the new name.

To create a new trigger, select the category you just created. Then select Trigger from the New menu. Select the trigger that you have just created. You will notice that there are now two checkboxes on the right of the trigger box:
Enabled - If this box is unchecked, this trigger is disabled and cannot be enabled during the game.
Initially On - If this box is unchecked, the trigger will start out disabled, but it can be enabled during the game through the use of the action "Trigger - Turn On". Note that a trigger that is told to run a trigger will ignore the on/off status.
There are also several fields on the right of the trigger box:
Comments - This field is for placing comments that will act as a mnemonic for you and for others who may wish to modify your script. Comments do not affect a trigger's functionality at all; they are for your own personal use in making notes.
Trigger Functions - Here the viscera of your trigger are displayed. You will notice that all of your events, conditions, and actions will be displayed in this part of the editor. If you add an event, condition, or action, it will be organized in its appropriate section here.
You can copy and paste events, conditions, and actions from trigger to trigger, or even from map to map. To edit an event, condition, or action you have already created, all you have to do is double-click that event, condition, or action.

Some other things that you may or may not be familiar with in the editor are variables, functions, and presets.

Variables
You can open the Variables part of the editor by hitting Ctrl + B or by selecting Variables from the Edit menu in the Trigger Editor. These variables behave much like variables in a programming language like BASIC or C. Variables are like buckets that the editor uses to hold certain types of data, but these are fickle buckets: they will only carry one type of data. For example, you cannot place an integer into a unit variable.

With triggers you can refer to objects that are pre-placed on the map. Say you want to use an action on a unit. Then open the action that you want to use on the unit, and left-click the appropriate part of that action's grammar text. The red and blue underlined text delineates the parts of the action that can be modified. Now click the Select a Unit button. Then select the unit on your map. Your selected unit's variable name will now be in the variable list.

Try this: on an empty map, place an Orc Peon. Open the Trigger Editor by hitting F4. Create a category by hitting Ctrl + G. Then create a trigger by hitting Ctrl + T. Use Ctrl + R to create a new action. Hit the u key in the menu and locate the nearby action "Unit - Kill." The grammar text of this trigger is "Unit - Kill (Triggering unit)." Left-click the blue underlined text, "(Triggering Unit)." Left click the button that says, Select a Unit (to the left of the Edit Variables button). Select the Peon. Congratulations! You've associated this trigger with the Peon on your map. All units that are pre-placed on a map have a variable name associated with them.

If you wish to have a more thorough explanation of variables, it is recommended that you learn to program in any computer language. (C++ rules!)

Functions
The Trigger Editor contains many functions to allow users more flexibility and control than past Blizzard editors have been able to provide. Functions are generally used in conjunction with variables and specific data types. An example of a useful function is "Last Created Unit." This function allows you access to the unit that was just created via "Unit - Create," and in fact it is one of only two functions that allow you to refer to a unit that was created during the game's execution (the other being "Last Created Unit Group"). These functions can be used in lieu of a unit variable or a unit that is pre-placed on the map. Remember, though, that functions return values; you cannot manually set a function equal to some value like a variable. You can however set a variable equal to a function.

If, for example, you have just detected via an event that a Hero has leveled, then "Event Response - Leveling Hero" will only refer to that particular Hero. You cannot simply set the function equal to some other Hero, and hope that the World Editor will be happy. If you wish to level a specific Hero, you must use some other way of detecting that Hero (e.g., the event "Unit - Player-Owned Unit Event" and the condition "Unit-Type Comparison"), then use an appropriate action on the Hero, such as "Hero - Set Level."

Presets
Presets are data built into the editor. You do not need to do anything to have them available, and they never change. An example of a preset is "Player 1 (Red)."

Value
Another field you will often be able to modify is the Value field. This field allows you to enter information directly. For instance this field appears on the action, "Game - Text Message (Auto-Timed)". If you left-click the blue underlined word Text, you will open up the String window. The last option in this window will be Value. If you want a simple message, you can type it directly into this field; you do not have to create a new


*Note : you can also learn from other maps for further informations about the Trigger editor.

4)
c)The Sound Editor

The Sound Editor allows you to import and export sound (.wav) files and music (.mp3) files and then play these sounds through triggers in the Trigger Editor. To open the Sound Editor, use F5 or choose Sound Editor from the Module menu.

Have you ever wanted to listen to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony while playing Warcraft? Well, now you can. Please be aware, though, that Battle.net will not allow you to pass maps over four megabytes in size; importing sound and music files into your map has the potential to make your map un-passable across Battle.net because imported sound and music files are stored within the map file itself and are often over four megabytes in size. (Using internal music and sounds will not increase your map's size, however.)

Sounds and music are organized into two sections. The section on the left (similar to the Terrain Editor's brush list) has all the internal sounds. You cannot alter the internal sounds on this list. To expose internal sounds or music for use in your triggers, simply select that file, then select Use Internal Sound or Use Internal Music; then the sound or music will appear in the list of sounds and music on the right.

This list on the right contains all the sounds and music that you have imported and the internal sounds and music that you are using.

You can play a sound or music file by double-clicking on the file when it is on the internal list of sounds or by selecting it and hitting the Play Sound button in the toolbar. To stop sounds and music from playing, simply hit the spacebar or select Stop All Sound Playback from the toolbar.

To edit a selected sound or music file's properties simply double-click on it when it is in the list on the right or select it and select Edit Sound Properties or select Rename Sound Variable. The Sound Properties has the following options and information:
File - The file name of the sound or music.
Format - The max kilohertz of the sound, its bit-rate (for .mp3) or sample rate (for .wav), and number of channels (for .wav) or encoding method (for .mp3).
Length - The duration of the sound.
Variable - This is the variable name that will be displayed in the list of sound variables in the Trigger Editor. This is the only option that can be modified on a music file (.mp3).
Options - Looping - The sound file will play repeatedly until ordered to stop.
3D sound - The sound file will have 3D aspects and therefore will require positioning to play.
Stop when out of range - The sound file will stop when the user is not in range to hear it.

Volume- Increase the relative volume of the sound.
Fade In Rate - How quickly the sound fades in. The higher the number, the faster the sound fades in. The default is instant.
Fade Out Rate - How quickly the sound fades out. The higher the number, the faster the sound fades out. The default is instant.
Pitch - Increasing this number increases the speed at which the sound is played.
Effect - Special effects that can be added to a sound. These effects are only compatible with certain sound cards, however.
Min Distance - The sound level at the minimum distance that the sound can be heard.
Max Distance - The sound level at the maximum distance that the sound can be heard.
Distance Cutoff - The distance at which the sound will begin to fade out.

To use sounds you have added to your map, you must access them through the Trigger Editor. When you have imported a sound or music file, or added internal sounds or music to the list of sounds on the right side of the editor, you can play them in the Trigger Editor through the actions "Sound - Play Sound" or "Sound - Play Music".

Remember that 3D sounds must be attached to a specific location for them to play, be it a unit or region, and you must also be within range to hear them.





4)
d)The Object Manager

Because there are so many objects and ways in which they can be linked in this powerful new editor, there must be an efficient and easy way of managing them; hence, the need for the Object Manager.

The Object Manager is at heart a summary of all the objects in your map. Yet, it is also a neatly organized list of all these objects, and it allows you access to modify them and see where they are placed on your map. Not sure if you selected the right Peasant for your trigger? Simply select that unit by its variable name in the Object Manager, and you can see where it is placed on your map by selecting View Object from the Edit menu.

If you double-click on an object's icon, or if you select the object and select Edit Object properties from the Edit menu, you will be able to access its unit properties dialog. This is especially useful when you are creating very large maps, or your own campaigns.

The Object Manager also manages your triggers. If the object is referenced in a trigger, you can expand it in the tree to see every category of every trigger that references it. By double-clicking on a trigger in this list, you can open the Trigger Editor to the associated trigger.

By selecting a trigger and expanding it, you can also see every object and variable referenced in that trigger's code. You can then cross-reference that object or variable and view everything that references it.


4)
e)The Campaign Editor


The Campaign Editor allows you to organize and manage your campaign's general options, loading screen interface, custom objects and imported files.

General
Name - Here you can name your campaign.
Suggested Players - List what types of games and configurations your campaign works best with.
Author - Give your name or your handle.
Description - Here you can tell players what to expect from your campaign.
Use Difficulty Levels - When enabled, your campaign can be modified to be easier or harder by referencing the condition "Game Difficulty Comparison" in the Trigger Editor.
Map Files - Shows all maps that have been added to your campaign in the loading screen tab.

Loading Screen

Here you can create the interface between your campaign maps. The background screen and ambient sound are added here, as well as the buttons to represent individual campaign maps.
ID - This is the number that can be referenced by the action "Show/Hide Custom Campaign Button" in the Trigger Editor.
Visible - Signifies whether or not the button will be visible when the campaign is first accessed.
File Loaded - Name of the map that the button references.
Chapter - Here you can name the chapter heading (Prologue, Chapter 1, etc.).
Title - Here you can name the chapter title.
Background Screen - Choose what background to have for your campaign screen.
Ambient Sound - Choose what sound to have for your campaign screen.

Custom Data

Each of your campaign maps has access to all objects in this centralized Object Editor. Any units, items, doodads, abilities or upgrades that are here will be useable by your campaign maps. See the Object Editor documentation for more explicit details.

Imported Files

Each of your campaign maps has access to all imported files in this centralized Import Manger. Any files that you have imported here will be usable by any of your campaign maps. See the Import Manager for more explicit details.

4)
f)The Import Manager
Just as you can use the Object Manager to manage the connections linking all the objects in the game, you can use the Import Manager to manage the files that can now be imported into the game.

The Import Manager keeps track of the imported file's name, type, size, and the path. Once the map is saved, files in the Import Manager are packed into a single file with the map, making the sharing of the map much easier.


4)
g)The Object Editor
The Object Editor allows customization of units, items, doodads, abilities and upgrades. These objects can then be placed in your map or exported and be used by the Campaign Editor or AI Editor. Each object can have up to 11 different classes of modifications. Below is a brief explanation for each object type, along with a few examples.

Units
Abilities - Modify what abilities the unit has and what ability is active when the unit comes into play. This can include any ability in the abilities tab.
Art - Modify what the unit looks like. Examples include the following: model, color, size, elevation, and icon interface.
Combat - Modify how the unit behaves in combat. Examples include the following: what the attack looks like, how often it can attack, how much damage it does, what the attack sounds like, and what range its attack has.
Editor - Modify how the unit is treated in the editor. Examples include what editor menus this unit appears on, and whether the unit will drop items when it dies
Movement - Modify how the unit moves. Examples include the following: what priority the unit has in group formations, what the unit's base speed is, how quickly the unit turns, and whether or not the unit flies.
Pathing - Modify the unit's pathing properties. Examples include the unit's collision and the manner in which an AI will treat the unit.
Sound - Modify how the unit sounds. Examples include the sounds the unit makes when it moves, dies, or is selected.
Stats - Modify the unit's stats. Examples include the following: how much the unit costs to build, how much food the unit costs and produces, how quickly the unit can be built, what type of unit it's classified as (mechanical, town hall), the repair cost of the unit, how much health the unit has, and how much mana the unit has.
Techtree - Modify where the unit is in the techtree. Examples include what upgrades the unit uses and what the unit requires to be built.
Text - Modify the unit's text interface. Examples include the following: the unit name, the unit's mouseover tooltips, and the unit description.

Items
Abilities - Modify what abilities the item has. This can include any ability in the abilities tab.
Art - Modify what the item looks like. Examples include the following: what color the item is, what model the item uses when it's on the ground, and what the icon looks like when a unit is holding the item.
Combat - Modify the material of an item to affect how it responds to being attacked.
Stats - Modify the item's stats. Examples include the following: what level the item is, whether it can be dropped or sold, how many items of that type can be stocked in a shop, and how often the item will be replenished in a shop.
Text - Modify the item's text interface. Examples include the following: the item's name, the item's mouseover tooltips, and the item's description.

Destructibles
Art - Modify what the destructible looks like. Examples include the following: model, color, size, and elevation.
Combat - Modify the material of a destructible to affect how it responds to being attacked.
Editor - Modify how the destructible is treated in the editor. Examples of this include what editor menus the destructible appears on, and where the destructible can can be placed.
Pathing - Modify the destructible's pathing. An example of this is defining whether the destructible can have a unit walk on it.
Sound - Modify the destructible's sound. Here it can be determined what sound a destructible will make upon being destroyed.
Stats - Modify the destructible's stats. Examples of this include hit points, build time, and gold and lumber repair cost.
Text - Modify the name of the destructible.

Doodads
Art - Modify what the doodad looks like. Examples include the following: model, color, size, and elevation.
Editor - Modify how the doodad is treated in the editor. Examples include what editor menus the destructible appears on, and where the doodad can be placed.
Pathing - Modify the doodad's pathing. An example of this is defining whether the doodad can have a unit walk on it.
Sound - Modify the doodad's sound. Here it can be determined what sound a doodad makes.
Text - Modify the name of the doodad.

Abilities
Art - Modify what an ability looks like. Examples include the following: what art the ability icon uses, where the icon is placed on a unit's command card, what the ability's effect looks like, and where the ability's effect model attaches to.
Data - Modify fields that are unique to a particular ability. Examples of this include how much damage Dispel Magic deals to summoned units, how much life Heal restores, and which unit is created from Raise Dead.
Sound - Modify the sound created from an ability. This includes the initial sound as well as any sound that continues playing.
Stats - Modify the stats of an ability. Examples of this include area of effect, cooldown, casting time, mana cost, and what types of targets are allowed.
Techtree - Modify the techtree requirements of an ability. This includes modifying what units and/or levels are required to use an ability.
Text - Modify the ability's text interface. Examples include the following: the ability's name, the ability's mouseover tooltips, the ability's description, and the ability's hotkey assignments.

Upgrades
Art - Modify what an upgrade looks like. This includes what icon art the upgrade uses and where the icon is placed on a unit's command card.
Data - Modify fields that are unique to a particular upgrade. Examples of this include: Iron Forged Swords' attack bonus, Spiked Barricades' damage bonus, and Impaling Bolt's pierce effect.
Stats - Modify an upgrade's stats. Examples of this include: gold and lumber cost of the upgrade, the number of levels this upgrade has, and the amount of time it takes to research the upgrade.
Techtree - Modify the techtree requirements of an upgrade. This includes modifying what units and/or levels are required to research the upgrade.
Text - Modify the upgrade's text interface. Examples include the following: the upgrade's name, the upgrade's mouseover tooltips, and the upgrade's description.

4)
h)The AI Editor
The AI Editor is where you can create artificial intelligence that will command an army's development and attack strategies.

General
Name - Here you can name your AI.
Race - Select which race you would like to create an AI for. The custom race option allows the integration of custom units, abilities and upgrades. Remember to import the custom data.

Options
Set Player Name - Enable this option to set the in-game player name to the entered AI name.
Melee - Use a melee AI for standard melee games. Melee AIs tend to attack and defend more closely with allied players.
Target Heroes - With this option enabled, the AI will place a higher priority on attacking Heroes during battle.
Repair Structures - Enable this option to have workers automatically repair structures when needed.
Heroes Flee - With this option enabled, Heroes will attempt to flee from battle if they are seriously injured or unable to attack.
Units Flee - With this option enabled, non-Hero units will attempt to flee from battle if they are seriously injured or unable to attack.
Groups Flee - With this option enabled, attacking groups will attempt to retreat from battle if they are losing or at a disadvantage.
Have No Mercy - With this option enabled, the AI will watch for opportunities to attack when the enemy appears to be weakened or at a disadvantage. This attack corresponds with the Enemy - Major Assault attack priority.
Ignore Injured - Enable this option to ignore units with less than 50% life when assembling attack forces.
Remove Injured -Enable this option to periodically send injured units home (or to a fountain of life) to recover.
Take Items - With this option enabled, Heroes will attempt to pick up any useful items they encounter.
Slow Harvesting - With this option enabled, only 1 gold or wood will be harvested by workers instead of the normal amount. This gives the AI a slight economic handicap.
Allow Home Changes -This option allows the AI to potentially choose a new location as a home base for gathering and retreating forces.
Smart Artillery - With this option enabled, artillery units will attempt to come forward and mount a siege attack on an enemy base when possible.
Custom Data

Import - Import custom data exported from the Object Editor to include in your AI.
Export - Export custom data to examine someone else's custom AI data in the Object Editor.
Clear - Remove all custom data from your AI.

Conditions - Conditions can be configured here that are similar in form to the conditions in the Trigger Editor but are specialized for and only used with the AI Editor. Conditions created here can be used throughout the AI editor.
A helpful concept when creating AI conditions is that of the AI captain, of which there are two types, attack and defense. The captains are invisible units without collision that act as guides for the AI. The attack captain stays at the base structure (Town Hall, Great Hall, etc.), waiting for the attack wave to form. Once formed, the attack captain leads the attack wave to the current attack priority and then returns to the base. The defense captain stays in between the base and the first gold mine unless an attack on the base occurs. The defense captain then leads defense forces to attack the intruders.

Heroes
Heroes Used - Choose the Heroes you want the AI to train. Available Heroes are based on the race selected in the General tab.
Training Order - Modify each training order's chance it has to be run by the AI. Training order corresponds with the Heroes selected in Heroes Used.
Skill Selection - Modify the order in which the AI's Heroes will learn skills.
Building
Base Building - Select which unit will be used as the AI's base building. The options available here correspond to the race selected in the General tab.
Mine Building - Select which unit will be used as the AI's gold mining building. This is generally used for undead only, though other units with the Blighted Gold Mine Ability can be selected here.
Build Priorities - The AI's build, research and upgrade orders are specified here. When a unit dies, it will be replaced by the AI unless the AI has insufficient resources, or some condition prevents it. There are five columns here for build priorities: Build - What will be built, researched or upgraded.
Total - Keeps track of the number of priorities of the same build type. The number without parentheses shows the total for all of the AI. The number inside the parentheses only shows the total at the town specified.
Food - Keeps track of the food used as well as the food cap. When a priority makes the food used go beyond the food cap, that priority will be red.
Town - Specifies where to process the build order.
Condition - If the condition specified here isn't met, the AI will skip this build priority and go to the next one. The condition can be one that was created under the General tab, or it can be custom-created for this priority only.
Gold Worker - Select which unit will be used as the AI's gold harvesting unit. The options available here correspond to the race selected in the General tab.
Lumber Worker - Select which unit will be used as the AI's lumber harvesting unit. The options available here correspond to the race selected in the General tab.
Harvest Priorities - The AI's harvest orders are specified here. There are four columns here for harvest priorities:
Harvest - Resource you want your worker to harvest.
Workers - Number of workers that share the same priority.
Town - Where the workers will harvest.
Condition - If the condition specified here isn't met, the AI will skip this harvest priority and go to the next one. The condition can be one that was created under the General tab, or it can be custom-created for this priority only.

Attacking

Attack Groups - The AI's attack groups are listed and created here.
Current Group - Attack groups get their definition here. There are three columns for each entry in the attack group. Unit Type - The type of unit. The units available are determined by the race selected in the General tab.
Quantity - The number of units that match the particular unit type you have selected.
Condition - If the condition specified here isn't met, the current group won't include this entry. The condition can be one that was created under the General tab, or it can be custom-created for this priority only.
Attack Waves - The order of your attack waves are specified here. There are three columns for each entry in the attack group. # - The wave number. This can be referenced in integer comparison conditions.
Attack Group - The name of the attack group that's assigned to the wave.
Delay - The amount of time before the next wave will start.
Minimum Forces - The minimum units necessary to send an attack wave.
Initial Delay - The amount of time before the first wave attacks.
Repeat Waves - How many waves, from the last wave, will repeat after the last wave has been sent.
Target Priorities - The targets for your attack waves. There are two columns here. Target - Choose the AI's attack target. The targets higher on the list will be at a higher priority.
Conditions - If the condition specified here isn't met, the target will be skipped when assessing which target to attack. The condition can be one that was created under the General tab, or it can be custom-created for this priority only.

Test Configuration
This tab is used exclusively for AIs that you want to test using a melee map. For custom maps, import an exported AI file into your Import Manager and then use the Test Map command.
Games Speed - Modify the speed of the game when Test AI is used.
Game Options - Disable the Fog of War to allow for visibility of the whole map. Disable the Victory/Defeat conditions to avoid unnecessary interruptions.
Map File - Set map for the AI to be tested on.
Players - Individual player settings are set here. For each player there are the following options: Control - Choose the controller of this slot.
Race - Choose the race played by the controller.
Team - Choose what team the controller is on.
Color - Choose the controller's team color.
Handicap - Choose the controller's handicap.
AI - If Computer is selected as the controller, choose the AI used.
AI Difficulty - If Computer is selected as the controller, choose the AI difficulty. The AI difficulty can be referenced in your AI conditions.
AI Script - If Computer is selected as the controller and Custom is selected for AI, an imported AI can be used for the slot.
 
Level 8
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
308
you can choose the part you think you need to know what the button in it does, not to read the entire toturial.

like for example. your cool in trigger editor, but dont know what button X does in the object editor

here you can find what the button X does.
 
Top