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Thor the Thundergod

Submitted by olofmoleman
This bundle is marked as approved. It works and satisfies the submission rules.
Yes people, I'm back at Wc3 modding. At least for a while, I have some old projects I want to finish. I still not doing requests though.

Anyway, here's a model I've been wanting to make for ages, but never got around actually making it, Thor, the Thundergod.

Also, incase someone wonders why there aren't any wings or horns on his helmet, this is not the stupid version like the Marvel hero, this is a more accurate Thor how he should look, like any other viking, without shit on his helmet.

Made by Olof Moleman, based on the Paladin model.

Updated:
Made the belt and gauntlets more accurate, made the face and hair completely freehand, changed the colour of the bear skin and fixed some UV issues.


Texture path:
Textures\Thor.blp

Give credit if you use this in your map

Please do not distribute or modify this resource without permission.

Keywords:
viking, Thor, thunder, god, lightning, mythology, pagan
Contents

Thor the Thundergod (Model)

Thor the Thundergod (Model)

Reviews
Moderator
16:29, 6th Dec 2008 General Frank: Works ingame and performs very well. ~ Approved.
  1. Kuhneghetz

    Kuhneghetz

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    I've noticed an issue with the texture (not the model, but the texture itself).
    The default color of the cape thingy is red and will clash with team colors, mixing them up into odd colors. I'm sure it can be fixed if you make the cape texture greyscaled.
     
  2. Dark Destiny

    Dark Destiny

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    I think thor looks great olof!
     
  3. Direfury

    Direfury

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    Olof stole my idea :(
     
  4. Dionesiist

    Dionesiist

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    And Norse mythology also stole your idea, Revellion.
     
  5. olofmoleman

    olofmoleman

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    If you'd look at this skin simply pasted on the paladin model you'd see that a model edit is very nessecery, the paladin model has horrible UV mapping, which I think I already stated, but no one seems to bother READING anything before posting about subjects already discussed.
    but anyway, no. A skin would not do the job. And vikings were dressed very plain btw.

    That's right, I stole your idea while being inactive and not even visiting this site. Infact, I even stole it from you before you thought of it! I've had a half finished Thor lying around for atleast two years.
     
  6. Direfury

    Direfury

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    Well you finished your Thor first, atleast.

    :(
     
  7. RoleplayingKing

    RoleplayingKing

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    Yea....no they didn't...research before you critize a model like this.

    Always pisses me off when people say "Dude, wtf? Vikings have horns!" Speaking of which, anybody know where that myth started?

    Great model, now you've got Odin, Frey, Freyja, Loki, Tyr...XD
     
  8. terradont

    terradont

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    Seconded
    Hel, Höder, Nidhogg...etc...
    Doubt Olof will make them though xD
     
  9. olofmoleman

    olofmoleman

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    Yes actually, some helmets have cheek protection, you know those flaps on the side of the helmet, like the ones roman helmets. Some northern European helmets had such cheek flaps too (not unlike this one from Sutton Hoo http://lh6.ggpht.com/_sA0GMJLjzis/Ra1DtsiWMiI/AAAAAAAAAj4/H6xoKqHMDT0/Sutton+Hoo+Helm+j.jpg ). Now, if you flip these flaps on to the top side of the helmet and bind them together (this was done to gain greater view while still wearing the helmet), when these flaps were raised, they look a bit like antlers or horns, thus with a bit of imagination a myth is easily born.


    While I wasn't planning on making more, and I also don't do requests, I'm not ruling out that I might make some more characters or monsters from Norse Mythology.

    Btw, I already made a Lindworm some time back (Scandinavian/Germanic dragon)
     
  10. terradont

    terradont

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    Yeah, well if you would feel like doing another norse model, one that would be useful would definetly be Hel. (this is not a request, i promise!)
     
  11. RoleplayingKing

    RoleplayingKing

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    Hm, never heard some of them had flaps. Is it chainmail, because if its chainmail yea. And i also read some archaelogists believe that Norse Priests has ceremonial headdresses with horns, but thats not proven. And for the record, that was just a joke, not intentional as a command. Thanks for the reply. 5/5 Model, forgot to say that. :D
     
  12. Tha Flamestorm

    Tha Flamestorm

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    Ahum, i myself am Norse, i would know...i basicly have a book [irish count as norse] and yes, the vikings did have horns on their helmets, well...at least only the War heroes did....so meh, i am teh victorian.[meh?Randomwordmuch:p]
     
  13. Tha Flamestorm

    Tha Flamestorm

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    BTW, the late vikings had horns on them...After the so called "Ragnarok" the vikings started to follow their beliefs more efficiently, and believed that if they put horns on their helmets they would be touched by their gods. so blegh.....
    P.S. NEVER CRITICIZE A IRISH MAN WITH A PINT OF BEER IN HIS HAND AND IS HALF PISSED/OFF.<true fact, I'd roll you if i knew where you lived.>
    EDIT: Also, i was slightly drunk when i said that...and caps lock was on i think. so don't think i was screaming......
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2008
  14. Tha Flamestorm

    Tha Flamestorm

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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2008
  15. terradont

    terradont

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    There is an edit button you know? And i too am...Norse... if you can call it that.
    And your "proof" is just a modern-age roleplaying helmet.
    (Guh tripleposting...)
    EDIT:
    Quote
    No self-respecting Viking warrior ever wore a horned helmet in battle--they weren't that dumb. As anyone who has done any slaughtering can tell you, horns provide nothing more than a good handhold to steady your work while you're slitting someone's throat. Nor did Viking warriors wear wings on their helmets, as they were commonly depicted doing before the horned image took over. Popular belief to the contrary isn't entirely baseless, though. Historical and archaeological evidence indicates that priests among the Norse and earlier Germanic peoples did wear headgear with horns (but not wings) in religious ceremonies. Furthermore, the ancient Celts wore helmets with wings (or other weird stuff), also for ceremonial purposes. The use of horned headdress in religious ceremonies wasn't limited to Germans and Celts--there are dozens of examples from around the world dating back to the earliest civilizations.

    Who started the idea that Vikings wore a pair of horns on their helmets in battle? Ancient Greek and Roman writers got the ball rolling. They described the inhabitants of northern Europe wearing all manner of outlandish things on their heads. For example, Plutarch described the Cimbri, the likely ancestors of at least some of the Vikings, wearing "helmets, made to resemble the heads of wild beasts," horns included. Diodorus Siculus had earlier described a similar habit of the Gauls, who were a Celtic rather than Germanic people. The Gauls, he writes, wore winged helmets or helmets with horns or antlers or whole animals attached. (The tradition continues apace; I've met Celts with all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of their heads, mostly but not entirely limited to the one day each year when green beer miraculously flows like water.)

    Archaeological finds, all but one of which date from the ninth century B.C. to about the seventh century C.E., back them up on the horn thing, but only to a degree. The ancients implied that such helmets were used in battle, but a ceremonial use is more likely. The finds consist mostly of images from rock carvings, horn carvings, coins, engraved metal objects, etc. A few actual horned helmets have been found; most are Germanic helmets from Denmark, but one is a Celtic model dredged from the Thames. None of these ceremonial horned helmets match the stereotypical image of a metal helmet with ox horns attached. For example, two Bronze Age horned helmets unearthed at Viksø, Denmark sport long twisting horns made of metal. The Thames helmet to my mind suggests an ancient priest who got drunk enough to think it was a good idea to wear Madonna's cone bra on his head.

    Even the latest of these archaological finds, with one exception, are a century or two shy of the Viking Age proper, which is somewhat arbitrarily reckoned to have started in A.D. 793, the year of the Viking raid on Lindisfarne. The exception is the horn-wearing man depicted on the ninth-century Oseberg tapestry discovered in Norway a hundred years ago. It may represent a continuation of the pre-Viking ceremonial use of horned headdress by the Norse. That wouldn't be too surprising; Norse culture didn't radically change in 793. On the other hand, it could be a new custom imported from the east. Herodotus reported that the Thracians, the prototypical steppe barbarians to the ancient Greeks of his day, wore horned helmets. It's possible the Vikings encountered something of the same sort in their travels through Russia or elsewhere in the east.

    The first image of horned helmets to be found was an engraved horn from Gallehus, Denmark, discovered in 1734. However, European artists had begun portraying ancient (pre-Viking) Germans wearing horned helmets as early as 1616, on the authority of the ancient writers. Since the ancients weren't clear on the ceremonial purpose of the helmets, they were often used in battle scenes. The use of horned helmets in German heraldry during the Middle Ages can probably be attributed to the same authors.

    How did the priests' headdress get transferred to intrepid Viking warriors? Blame artists, not archaeologists or historians. The Viking got his horned and winged helmets during the Romantic period (late 1700s to mid-1800s). Romantic artists rejected the constraints of Classicism and started to explore, among other themes, ancient Germanic and Celtic history and mythology. These artists weren't always careful about the details and sometimes depicted a hodgepodge of Germanic, Celtic, and classical motifs. (Would you believe a Viking driving a chariot?) Romantic artists gave Vikings Celtic-style winged helmets before they got horned ones.

    In the 1820s the Swedish artist Gustav Malmström was the first to give horns to Vikings, as opposed to pre-Viking Germans like the Cimbri. He did so in illustrations for an edition of Frithiof's Saga (1820-25). This Swedish poem by Esaias Tegnér was based on a poor excuse for an Old Icelandic prose saga written at a time when the once great saga tradition was beginning its long sad descent into what E. V. Gordon called the "turgid monotony of the fourteenth-century tales of kings, queens, and knights in fantastic adventure." Tegnér's sappy reworking was unaccountably popular and influential around the world. The various English translations were largely responsible for popularizing the word Viking in English.

    Where did Malmström get the idea for a horned helmet? By the time the poem came out, plenty of archaeological evidence indicated that horned headgear was used in ancient times, although it still wasn't clear that such helmets were purely ceremonial and may have disappeared before the Viking era. At any rate, Malmström's idea didn't catch on right away. While the illustrations for some English translations of the poem also featured horned helmets, the winged variety remained the norm for several more decades.

    Horned helmets were given a boost by amateur archaeologist Axel Holmberg, who in the 1840s and '50s assigned to the Viking Age a rock carving that depicted men wearing what he claimed were iron helmets with attached ox horns. In fact the carving dated to the Bronze Age (no later than 500 BC), and only Holmberg could discern what material the horns were made of. His ideas didn't do much to popularize the idea among artists or the public, but quite a few archaeologists and historians were hornswoggled for a while. The professionals eventually came to their senses, but by then horned helmets had become common on Viking heads in art.

    Richard Wagner is often credited with popularizing the idea of horned helmets, although he never wrote an opera about Vikings. His operatic cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen, the four parts of which were first produced between 1869 and 1876, depicted Germanic gods and heroes in the mythical past, not during the historical Viking era. Most opera fans neither knew nor cared that the Viking Age didn't start until A.D. 793, though, and some apparently assumed all barbarian warriors in northern Europe wore pointy headgear. Wagner had also used a horned helmet in the original production of Tristan und Isolde in 1865. This is even further from Vikings, because the story is a Celtic, not a Germanic, legend.

    In Wagner's operas, horned helmets are now most closely associated with the Valkyries, but as originally staged the Valkyries wore helmets with wings. (The Valkyries didn't get horny until Wagner died.) The only major figure in the whole cycle who wore a horned helmet in the early productions was Hunding. Those who have somehow managed to stay awake through the entire four-hour production of Die Walküre may remember Hunding as the boor who objected to his wife sleeping with her brother. Wagner and his costume and set designer Carl Emil Doepler probably borrowed the idea not from the few scattered images of Vikings wearing horned helmets, but from the costumes in stage plays about ancient pre-Viking Germans.

    The horned helmet didn't immediately replace the winged helmet. The trend grew slowly until the early 1890s, when the one started horning in on the other's territory, especially in German and English illustrated children's books about Vikings. After that it was bully for horns while wings just fluttered. Winged helmets finally crashed about the time of the First World War and weren't seen much thereafter until reincarnated for Thor and Asterix, a comic rebirth if I ever saw one.

    If Viking warriors didn't wear winged or horned helmets in battle, what did they wear? Many probably didn't wear helmets at all. Writing about seven centuries before the Viking era, the Roman historian Tacitus says most Germans didn't. But we needn't take his word for it. Contemporary Viking era artwork shows roughly half of Vikings in battle bareheaded, while the rest wear unremarkable dome-shaped or conical helmets. Few helmets have survived from the Viking Age, probably because the rank-and-file wore leather helmets that didn't last. The few metal ones that have been discovered presumably belonged to the richest Vikings. Some are iron "spectacle" helmets, so called because they have bronze eye-and-nose guards that look a bit like a pair of glasses except that there's nothing at all nerdy about them. I'm willing to bet that anybody who called their wearers "four-eyes" was soon made to see the light--or stars.
     
  16. Tha Flamestorm

    Tha Flamestorm

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    Terra, i actually DID edit...their is a thing saying "EDITED BY THA FLAMESTORM; Yesterday at 05:30 PM[saying this while i read it].
    oh and, i really think it'd be more like thor if you put that winged helmet on his head, he sorta looks like Odin but with a hammer.<<i mean at the moment without a winged helmet.lol
     
  17. Dionesiist

    Dionesiist

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    ... He said you should've edited your previous post instead of double-posting you noob...
     
  18. terradont

    terradont

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    Do i need to say more? :razz:
     
  19. Rakay

    Rakay

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    Sorry man, thats only comic stuff, Vikings did not wear helmets whit horns.
    Bether not belive anything you read.
     
  20. gerbal_warfare

    gerbal_warfare

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    Christ you lot are whiners, its accurate, its well done. The helmet is actually a helmet and not just his hair greyed. If you think he needs to be more godly, go google "Norse God Thor" and take a look, Thor looks like your average Viking. But if possible maybe a custom animations so he could throw his hammer and have it return to him.
    Much better than any Mountain King or Paladin, definitely.