Dwarf Campaign (Voice Acted)

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About Dwarf Campaign
GG&K's Dwarf Campaign is a story-driven fully voice acted single player campaign for WarCraft III The Frozen Throne that sends the dwarves of Khaz Modan on a quest to explore the unknown, in hopes of saving their ancestral homeland. The campaign has three missions where you can choose to play from four difficulty settings and also features custom monsters, scripted events, music and spells. As an added bonus, the stand-alone version of Chapter 3 supports a two-player mode.

SPECIAL! Playable as separate map files with Warcraft III Reforged (Patch 1.32 or later)
You can download the Dwarf Campaign chapters as separate maps from dwarfcampaign.com and play them using classic graphics in Warcraft III Reforged:
- Chapter 1: Defenders of Dwarvenkind
- Chapter 2: City of the Seven Mithril Golems
- Chapter 3: Temple of the Old Gods (this chapter is also playable by two co-operative players online)

Sequel – Gnoll Campaign: Return to Yeenador
Sound Mind Games has released a sequel to the Dwarf Campaign called Gnoll Campaign: Return to Yeenador. You can download it using the following link:
Gnoll Campaign (Voice Acted)

Required Warcraft III Version
Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne, Patch 1.30.4 (get it here)

Installation Instructions
As of Warcraft III patch 1.30.4, you can install the campaign as follows:

Windows
  1. Download DwarfCampaign-v7.w3n from the Hive Workshop (using the big download button)
  2. Copy DwarfCampaign-v7.w3n to Documents\Warcraft III\Campaigns. If the Campaigns folder does not exist, you must create it.
macOS
  1. Download DwarfCampaign-v7.w3n from the Hive Workshop (using the big download button)
  2. Open Finder.
  3. Press and hold the OPTION/ALT key down, then go to the Finder menu in the top menu bar and open the "Go" menu. When you are holding the OPTION/ALT key down, the Library option will appear in the dropdown menu. Click "Library". Now you are in the Library folder.
  4. Open Application Support → Blizzard → Warcraft III.
  5. Create a "Campaigns" folder, if it does not exist.
  6. Copy DwarfCampaign-v7.w3n to the Campaigns folder.
Playing the Dwarf Campaign
  1. Start Warcraft III.
  2. Select Single Player → Custom Campaign.
  3. Select Dwarf Campaign in the file menu.
  4. Click Play Campaign.
Stand-Alone Map Files
Installation

Instead of putting the file into Campaigns folder, please put it to the Maps folder.

Playing
Start the game using Custom Game. For multiplayer, use Battle.net or LAN.

Selecting the Right Difficulty
Easy:
If you have been long time away from Warcraft III and you have not honed your skills to play the game lately, please choose the Easy difficulty.

Normal: If you know how the game functions, you are able to use hero abilities effectively, train a good mix of units, and create a good army, but you do not consider yourself as a super-good player, we recommend playing on the Normal difficulty.

Hard: If you are actually pretty good at the game, you can use hero and unit abilities to the maximum effect, you are able to micro units well, you know how to build an extremely effective army, and you know well what different abilities, items, and upgrades do, we recommend that you play on the Hard difficulty.

Very Hard: This difficulty is probably best used when two professional players are playing Chapter 3: Temple of the Old Gods together. It can also be chosen when single players want ultimate challenge.

Credits
Tommi Gustafsson: AI Programming, Minor Cinematic Sequences, Dialogue Scripting, Game Programming, Gameplay Balancing, Level Design, Monster Design and Balancing, Playtesting, Quality Assurance, Skill Design, Skill Balancing, Sound Editing, Story Writing, Terraining, and Web Pages.
Janne Gustafsson: Major Cinematic Sequences, Dialogue Scripting, Game Programming, Icon Design, Level Design, Modeling, Music Environment Design, Playtesting, Quality Assurance, Skinning, Story Writing, and Terraining.
Mikko Kangas: Dialogue Scripting, Grammar and Spelling Check, Level Design, Quality Assurance, and Story Writing
Blizzard Entertainment: WarCraft III: Reign of Chaos, WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne, Potion icons, Crossbow icons, Helmet icons, Meteor Swarm icon, and Brain icon.
GreyArchon: Thorp Blackpaw model, Dwarf Paladin model, Dwarf Statue models, Khaz Modan Banner skin, Malbodion model (partly), Bark Sharpnose model, Mithril Golem skin, and Modi Stonerunner model.
Panu Uomala: Artwork for the Map in City of the Seven Mithril Golems.
Benjamin Berts: Dwarven Worker icon
Diegoit: Lost Kobold model
Donut3.5: Faceless Mage model
Purplepoot: Faceless Mage model
Cookie: Force Gem model
Skizot: Potion models
IamMclovin: Dwarven Worker model
General Frank: Dwarven Warrior model and icon
Aaron Norell and Jaysin (www.dpistudios.net): Artwork for the dwarf picture in the loading screen
Carl Orff, MIT Concert Choir: Carmina Burana, O Fortuna (From the Free Music Archive, License: CC BY NC 3.0 US)
Kurt Rickerd and Matt Marcy: Dwarven Defenders
Pauli Kanervisto and Kei Uchida: Playtesting
DKSlayer: Chat message parsing algorithm

French Localization Team
Executive producer: Mister X
Chapter 1 translator: Gamers.jeux
Chapter 2 translator: Trollxul
Chapter 3 translator: Armelior
Anime expert: Aka Guymelef

Voice Actors
Chapter 1: Defenders of Dwarvenkind
Dylan: Andun Silverbeard, Buri Frostbeard, Yip-Horf, Lead Acolyte, Necromancers, Other acolytes, Dwarven Ancestral Spirits, and Goblin Armsdealer
Magic: Malbodion and Modi Stonerunner
SamuraiPanda: Ner'zhul (Lich King) and Golems
Jesse Cox: Jinto Reedwine
Writer: Dwarven Miner, Dwarven Mechanic, Dwarven Guard, Dwarven Smith, and Mortar Team
Lavarinth: Dwarven Captain and Gnoll Overseer
Shaggy Shanahan: Ogre Mauler (in prison), Gnolls (in prison), Gnoll Brute, and Ogre Lord (in encampment)
Tag Daze: Drunken Dwarves
Ed Khoo: Narrator
Timothy Banfield (FunnyGuyTimmy): Dwarf interface sounds

Chapter 2: City of the Seven Mithril Golems
JDJones: Theodin Rockheart
nevernotninja: Erogdin Earthstorm
Ben Balmaceda: Buri Frostbeard, Modi Stonerunner, Spectral Guard, Rifleman
Tom Resnick (tresnick): Tyrin Thunderbeard
NovusCrimson/R3: Gnoll Overseer
Jeremy Frutkin: Brother of Gnoll Overseer
Alucolor: Gnoll Warden
CrisKingVO: Gnoll and Gnoll Brute
LeLovelySuccubus: Cornulagon the Devourer
Elise Bellamy (SovereignEliseVA): Gna'ruul
dndan: Guardian Entity
Timothy Banfield (FunnyGuyTimmy): Aggronor the Mighty, Dwarf interface sounds

Chapter 3: Temple of the Old Gods
Jacob Eccles: Tollusek the Black
Jake Parr: Bark Sharpnose
Tom Schalk: Thorp Blackpaw
Bonnie Bogovich: Philiastrasza
C. J. Oliver (Nulldrive): Baraddin
Elise Bellamy (SovereignEliseVA): Queen of Suffering
Abigail Turner: Gnoll Warden and Rhagnol
Shaun: Thordur
Ralph Pangallo: Gnoll, Gnoll Brute, and Gnoll Assassin
Meadows1073: Primordial Mutant
Timothy Banfield (FunnyGuyTimmy): Dwarf Rifleman, Dwarf interface sounds
nevernotninja: Erogdin Earthstorm
Ed Khoo: Narrator

Change Log
V7 – June 22, 2019

General
- Added -voices chat command to open the voice control menu
- Faceless One dialogue sounds work in 1.31.1
- Changed game message colors to be consistent with Blizzard usage

Chapter 2
- Added a hint about how to make Gna'ruul join the party when she is in the Gnoll encampment
- Added some new dialogue lines for Gna'ruul
- Some minor bug fixes

Chapter 3
- Chaos Tentacles are now easier
- The All-Seeing Eye of the Inqusition's Anti-Magic Ray now does only 500 damage to mechanical units (down from 2000)
- Bark Sharpnose picks up the Howling Flail trigger works after saving and loading in 1.31.1 (bug workaround)
- Philiastrasza speaks a correct line when entering the Well of Corruption
- Added correct caster upgrade art for Gnoll Assassin


V6 – April 15, 2019

  • Fully voice acted
  • Tested to work with Patch 1.30.4
  • Several minor improvements and bug fixes
Contents

Dwarf Campaign (Campaign)

Reviews
Bob27: An excellent campaign, with a great story, gameplay and terrain. This would have to still be one of my favorite Warcraft III Campaigns. Approved.
Level 8
Joined
Oct 1, 2015
Messages
337
Excited to play the voiced version of the campaign
I'm currently near the end of chapter 2, just wanted to ask if the items (old shoe, adamantine gauntlet, piece of ancient Dwarven masonry, ancient artifact, vial of strange liquid) have any significance or are they miscellaneous insignificant items only?
 
Level 8
Joined
Oct 1, 2015
Messages
337
This is one of my favourite campaigns and I am glad to see it voiced too!
I played on Hard difficulty and it was extremely hard, the enemies attack in larger force and the faceless ones are harder to kill, I had to use cheats tbh when I fought the giant faceless one in the first chapter, and against some in the second chapter, and against the All-Seeing eye in the final chapter cause it was impossible to destroy though I'm not sure that I'm supposed to fight it.
I encountered a couple of bugs. First, the maximum food cap is 100 but when I scroll over the food cap tab it says up to 300. Second, well, it's not a bug but a simple time mistake. The narration at the start of the 3rd chapter I believe. The voice over doesn't wait till the end of each paragraph, instead, it overlaps with the voice over of the next paragraph and so on.

It is indeed as Bob27 said a fantastic campaign, with a decent story, gameplay and terrain.
 
Level 8
Joined
Oct 1, 2015
Messages
337
Thanks for the feedback. What version of Warcraft III did you use to play the campaign?
1.29.2

I decided to stay on this patch cause I took a little hiatus from playing and when I was back, I read that the versions after had many bugs and I am hesitant to upgrade to the latest patch.

If these glitches occurred because of my patch version then I'll edit them out
 
I tried it with 1.29.2 and indeed it does not work correctly. However, it works in patch 1.30.4.

The code looks the following:

upload_2021-3-5_18-3-35.png


So, it should wait for the amount of seconds equal to the narration length (+3 seconds). I cannot fathom, why the waiting time would ever be too short, even in patch 1.29.2.

:con:

I'll look into it what might be the problem.
 
Level 1
Joined
Sep 29, 2021
Messages
3
Hi guys, playing on 1.32 - i download this campaign, then create folder Campaigns in Documents WC3 and nothing appears - not in Campaigns, not in the solo game. If i just put it into maps - it doesn't open. What do i make incorrect?
 
Level 18
Joined
May 14, 2021
Messages
478
Hi guys, playing on 1.32 - i download this campaign, then create folder Campaigns in Documents WC3 and nothing appears - not in Campaigns, not in the solo game. If i just put it into maps - it doesn't open. What do i make incorrect?
Try to use Quenching Mod, but since this campaign has a Reforged version, you could try to use w3x version as the author suggests (put them into Maps folder instead of Campaigns). Remember to use SD graphics!
 
Level 8
Joined
Dec 1, 2021
Messages
54
So, I've recently been doing a playthrough of every campaign on hard (or very hard, in the case of this campaign), but with the twist of not being able to go above no upkeep, or 20/25 supply, if it was one of those missions where you can't build stuff. I decided to play through this one because of some fond memories, and because I though it would be interesting Especially since the player's power between the maps isn't connected like in most campaigns (cus Dwarf Campaign is only really a campaign in story), so the later missions won't depend on your ability to find hidden tomes.
But it turns out that the playthrough of this campaign has by far been the most frustrating one so far. All these boss fights and big encounters require amazing micro skills, and a reset back to fountains between basically every fight, as both the health and the mana of my units were burning down very fast.
Though the campaign gives you a ton of resources, so everything would be perfectly ok... if my heroes didn't cost supply for no reason whatsoever. Like... that genuinely caught me off guard, and it meant that I could only use a maximum of 30 food for my army when I had 4 heroes. I have literally no idea why this is even a thing, since campaigns don't charge supply for your heroes, but I guess it's for balancing or some other nonsense.

Anyways, this campaign is a 10/10, maybe a high 9/10. It annoyed me quite a bit, which makes me wish that I could give it a lower rating, but that would simply be unfair. It would just be dumb to rate campaigns/maps based on annoyance (let alone on annoyance you had during a challenge run), as there are quite a few campaigns/maps that are annoying but good (hello To the Bitter End), but there are also ones that are not annoying at all but still mediocre.

The story felt pretty unique and decently fun.
  • It had a very similar feel to stories from D&D and from RPG games (mainly thanks to all the weird mystery hunting that kind of reminded me of Gravity Falls). And what's interesting is that it still manages to do this while keeping the grand scale that Warcraft 3 campaign stories always have.
  • Paying attention to details is genuinely rewarded here. This is one of the few campaigns where skipping cinematics and weird trivia can negatively impact your chances of winning, as you might end up throwing literal piss at people in chapter 3, rather than summoning a strong permanent unit or drunken hazing people.
  • I like how comedy works in this chapter. Funny moments all make perfect sense in the context of the story and characters (except for Theodin getting scared from a boss, that would have possibly fit better on a random dwarf), and I'm all for it.
  • One thing that the story kind of suffers from is the low number of chapters and the lack of interludes, which results in a huge amount of information getting crammed into 3 maps. I completely understand the reasoning behind this, but it kind of means that I've already forgotten quite a bit of what was mentioned as I was exploring, whereas I haven't really forgotten anything from The Tomb of Sargeras.
  • The cliffhanger ending that didn't get a follow up for 15 years is a tad annoying. Those are usually done to make people interested in the continuation, but here, it was kind of pointless. Though I imagine that the creators originally wanted much more than just the 3 chapters (as evidenced by Gnoll Campaign coming out waaaay after this one).

The gameplay is definitely a breath of fresh air for Warcraft 3.
  • This is probably one of the most balanced campaigns out there. Yeah, it has a few dumb moments here and there, but there's always something that the player can do to improve their chances in moments of struggle, which is good.
  • There are a ton of new systems that get introduced in this campaign. They aren't used or explored as much as they really could have been, but I'm still really happy about the fact that they're even here.
  • The approach towards resources is also a very unique thing about this campaign. The player starts off with extremely limited resource supplies, forcing him to be smart and efficient. Then he unlocks a huge lumber supply so you can get upgrades, and then a gold mine so he can spam all his upgraded units. It's great.
  • The way the player gets rewarded for winning tough fights and finding secrets is lovely. Each of the missions has this feeling of you starting out extremely weak with basically nothing, and by the end you become an absolute beast. It's especially satisfying because the game gives you very little for free, meaning that you have to work to get all the cool things that help you win, so you'll really feel rewarded for the all things that you've done, rather than trying to make up excuses for why you went through a tight unpleasant corridor that got a Lesser Replenishment Potion for your lategame intelligence hero that doesn't struggle with mana anymore.
  • Choices are definitely something you should be including in an RPG campaign, and this one has them too. They're not exactly complicated or hard choices, and there aren't many of them, but hey, you have the option be a xenophobic asshole, which is quite neat (makes me wonder if that has any long term consequences).
  • The tech trees are fairly ok. This campaign basically does this whole thing where you get two weak races mixed up into your team, like in Curse of the Blood Elves. Dwarves and gnolls already had a few units in the default game, and I appreciate it how instead of replacing them, the campaign keeps them and builds up new things on top of what people already know (the gnoll assassins and poachers are a perfect demonstration for this).

The heroes are an interesting topic here for sure.
  • Buri, Jinto, Erogdin and Theodin are literally 1 to 1 copies of heroes from the base Warcraft 3. That felt a little bit weird, as there definitely are interesting custom heroes in this campaign, and it's a pretty weird choice to make the main characters of the first two missions just default heroes. I guess the idea was that custom heroes are something the player should work for, similarly to the custom units and items of this campaign.
  • Yip-Horf (is this how he's pronounced?) is a pretty neat take on a brawler that hits you like a truck while being deceptively hard to kill. The combination of the Tauren Chieftain and the Blademaster fits him damn perfectly. He also kind of carried me at the end of CH1, so I'm grateful for that.
  • Gna'ruul is weird. Her kit kind of sounds like a standard offensive mage, but it's just a wonky mish-mash of weird abilities that don't fit together in any way shape or form, though I guess that's fitting for a faceless one. The Q manacost should probably be reduced by 10 or 20 though, it simply costs too much for what it offers.
  • Tyrin is almost like the default Lich, except with the smart twist of his Frost Armor being swapped to the skeletal mage summoning thingy, which now allows him to use Dark Ritual much more consistently (it would be pretty tricky otherwise, since you're using mostly gnolls and dwarves). Though there's his ultimate, which is kind of... well, extremely overpowered in that map with all the high health pool enemies, so I would look into that. Oh, and I've had a weird bug with his W, where it just randomly turned off (either due to cinematics of saves). Yeah, that could have just been me turning it off and forgetting about it, but it happened way more than usual, so it's a little suspicious.
  • Tollusek not being a normal Blood Mage is a pleasant surprise. His kit is kind of just "Archamge, but somewhat better and more fun" which I actually somewhat liked. His elementals having Hurl Boulder at max rank is pretty neat.
  • Bark felt a little strange. His base kit is the kit of an intelligence hero (both him and the Kepper of the Grove have CC as Q, summoning as W and aura as E), but then he gets his ultimate and his damage skyrockets as long as you give him a ton of mana. He's basically a ranged carry that you have to treat as a caster, but his auto steroid being on his ult makes him feel a lot different than other ranged agility casters.
  • Thorp is a really neat way to do a "fighter who is also a leader" type hero. Conversion is probably on my top 5 list of coolest custom campaign abilities. His title being "Usurper" gave a bit of a spoiler though xd
  • Philiasztraza is kind of basic for someone who is supposed to be the daughter of an aspect, but she gets the job done. Her ult is kind of weird on an intelligence caster, but it's definitely a strong one. Don't really have anything else to say here, she's just fine.

There were some other great things about this campaign.
  • The terrain and the map layouts are pretty ok. It's nothing too crazy, but they get the message across. And in most cases, the player gets enough space to reliably micro his army around, which is obviously pretty important here.
  • The difficulty system is obviously great. I really like it when campaigns put in very hard difficulty for masochists like me.
  • I really appreciate the fact that the creators actually went ahead and voice acted this entire thing. It does a lot of good for this campaign, as it's now a lot easier to take in that enormous lore with all its details and world building. I also felt like the voice actors did a pretty decent job, as basically everybody in this campaign had a voice that fit them well.
  • Replacing cinematic skips with a 2000% speed fast forward was a pretty interesting choice. I honestly prefer the normal skipping myself, as I only really do it when I've already seen a cinematic a lot due to reloading. But sure, I can see how this might be an improvement for some. (If you're skipping everything, then you don't have to press ESC non stop now. And I imagine it also helps make the campaign more bug free, as I've seen a few cinematic skip related bugs before)
  • The puzzles were impressive, and genuinely tricky for once. It was a lot more than just trial and error, but you could still get clues that can lead you to the right direction, and there was a lot of logic in the puzzles too.
  • One thing that I felt kind of iffy about is how the player basically never gets level 10 on their heroes (unless he rejects newcomers). It's not crucial, but it kind of removes that feeling of completion that you always have at the ends of campaigns when all skills are maxed out. I think there should be some tomes of powers in the very late stages of the maps.

And now with all of that out of the way, we move into the chapters themselves. Normally I just go through them one by one, writing down my random thoughts about each mission in its separate paragraph. That won't exactly work here, as we have fewer missions that are a lot more complex than most Warcraft 3 campaign maps, so I'll split up the missions into two sections, one where I talk about the overall design of the map, and one where I talk more about gameplay experiences and some other small things like suggestions or bugs

Alright, let's get to it then:

CHAPTER 1 DESIGN - This is a starting mission that sounds awful in concept, but actually works quite well in practice. Typically, the only campaigns that throw players into an extremely high stake situation right at minute 1 are sequel campaigns that are supposed to build on another campaign, but even those usually avoid it (like Arthas Campaign Orc, LoA Second Orc Book, every single default campaign except Legacy of the Damned, and so on). But the fact that you get so much time before the undead attacks actually start coming means that you have a lot of room to breathe. Having the undead constantly attack you while you're encouraged to go far into the opposite direction of your base would be extremely frustrating, so I'm happy that's not the case. The map itself doesn't have as many secrets as the next two, and it lacks in the puzzle department too, which is good, because the first map should always be the simplest one. That's mostly it tbh, this is just a neat map that shows you how this campaign is centered around exploring, while also showing what the story is about (even though the undead won't be the ones we're fighting in the following missions).

CHAPTER 1 GAMEPLAY - This may sound weird, but this map was actually the hardest and also the most frustrating one in my playthrough. The timer may be fine on most difficulties, but on very hard, it's quite the struggle to complete everything, and I actually ended up playing through the defense section without a gold mine (got everything else though). Normally, this would be impossible, but I managed to stall the AI for a really long time by luring them into the ale house and blacksmith areas with a Yip-Horf clone. Not sure if that was intended to be possible, as I've seen them deliberately ignoring things that might lead them off right or left, but I still managed to pull it off. They also only sent one big attack, and one smaller one after the reinforcements arrived. Now that I'm looking back at it, I probably cheesed the heck out of this AI, but it was still pretty close xd. Other than that, it was a great map. I liked the item crafting, the fortress gate, the extra defense purchases were neat (especially the land mines arriving as items rather than getting preplaced on the ground, cus now I can use them against a boss), and the item requirement for the third hero was cool, though at first I though he wanted an offensive adamantine item (seems artifact enough to me). Malbodion taunting you every time you loose a hero was badass, and more enemies in campaigns should do that, especially since hero losses aren't that common so it wouldn't be spammy like Tyrande in The Brothers Stormrage. Oh, and btw, the drunken dwarves can apparently stand up and fight normally if you lure some kobolds near them, and I doubt that was intended, though I didn't mind ofc.

CHAPTER 2 DESIGN - If someone says "Dwarf Campaign" this is the map that immediately comes into my mind. I honestly think this is one of the best maps out of all campaigns, and is the main reason why this thing got so popular. And I very rarely say this, but I actually feel like this map is perfectly designed. The layout, the story, the secrets, the enemies that become increasingly more difficult but still somewhat reasonable as you progress, the sidequests that all feel amazing to complete, the epic final fight that isn't too hard but it's autopilot/just A-click in levels of easy either... it just all adds up perfectly. The little map at the beginning was a decent addition, as it lets you get a solid grasp on what the map looks like from the very beginning, gives you an idea on where you'll need to go, and it's fun to compare the map with what the city has actually become. I genuinely can't give anything other than praise for the design of this map, and it makes me feel weird that I felt iffy about the campaign many years ago (maybe I now like it more cus of the updates, or the voice acting, or just because I got older, idk).

CHAPTER 2 GAMEPLAY - Yeah, this was a ton of fun. It was pretty annoying that I had to walk back to the fountain after basically every fight, but I knew I was signing up for that anyway. The fountains behind the trees with all those health and mana stones are neat, and I'm glad you didn't put in mini bosses there like some other mapmaker would have. The dwarven riddle was a neat idea, and I've had some fun trying to find wrong options that have been voice acted. (Is there a list for that somewhere btw? Just curious) The Teratonomicon is cool, even if saves can kind of cheese it, bookshelves hiding items was clever (would like to see that in more campaigns), the whole explanation for the Steam Tank - Siege Engine confusion was brilliant, the old king getting cured by Purge is smart (and logical, since we've all seen the last mission of Invasion of Kalimdor), the item rewards were absolutely crazy but they still didn't win the game for me, and the final fight was shockingly close and enjoyable, my heroes constantly dying and resurrecting with only 2 golems living by the end, and you bet that I stacked up on invulnerability pots to get those golems out with minimal danger (not sure if it would have been even possible without it, since I had to kill basically my entire army before the fight). I also just had a ton of fun with the heroes, since they play around each other pretty well, especially once you get Devolution from the Teratonomicon on multiple heroes, and you just swarm your enemies with summons that all get free bonus armor from your aura.

Now, the whole Tyrin hate against Gna'ruul was a little weird, because he isn't interested in the dwarves explaining why she is with them, but he also doesn't attack them, even though killing faceless ones and their followers is exactly what he wants to do, as they're the forces of evil that want to destroy the universe, so he shouldn't leave you alive if he believes that you work for them, and if he doesn't, then he shouldn't really care about her, as there's too much at stake here, so this confused me a little (though I found the dwarven cape, so everything was A-okay). Death and Decay did make a lot of boss fights a whole lot easier with its insane damage (especially the big hydra was kind of a walk in the park), maybe a little too easier, but at that point, I'm gonna take anything I can get. It's not like these 2 things ruin the map or anything, but if you're looking to change something, this is where you should look.

CHAPTER 3 DESIGN - This one is more similar to chapter 2 than 1, further solidifying the idea of this campaign. I found it to be a little bit weaker than the previous chapter, but there are still things that make it interesting and fun, so I wouldn't really call it a drop in quality. The fact that it wants to have two epic final fights makes them both feel more underwhelming than the one with the golems, but that's not really something you can deal with, unless you want to remake the entirety of this thing or split it into 2 chapters. But it still kept basically everything that made CH2 so great, so if you've had fun with the campaign so far, you're gonna have fun now too. While the theme of the previous levels was "ancient forgotten history", this one goes full on the "alien weirdness" instead. The map is pretty well crafted when it comes to showing you things about this absolutely insane race that you knew nothing about (well, almost nothing), even with the limitations that you get from trying to do this in a Warcraft 3 campaign.

CHAPTER 3 GAMEPLAY - The general gameplay of this mission is obviously kind of similar to the one from the previous chapter, especially with the way it treats lumber and gold, but there are still many new creative ideas that I really liked, plus there weren't as many returns to fountains (thanks for them auras, Bark and Tollusek). The potions were extremely weird and stupid, which is exactly what I liked about them (wish there would have been more). The gate puzzle and the stalagmite puzzle were both quite interesting, and they genuinely got me stuck on my first ever playthrough of this campaign. The dragon princess getting freed by Purge is kinda just a repetition of the previous sidequest, though I did see that the player could just buy a dispel wand from Baraddin instead (which is not worth it over the warden, but I digress). Speaking of Braddin, my god is this guy the MVP of this chapter. The lore tidbits are awesome, especially how the different characters react differently when reading the gnoll book. But he's also the reason why the gate is even possible to open, he sells a demonic spellbook with amazing spells that helped out immensely, and the ability to get lots of Teratonomicons is great. The items definitely went even stronger than on CH2, which I did not believe was possible, yet here we are. It made for a very satisfying fight around the Well of Eternity with my geared up heroes (especially with the 1500 mana Bark DPS), but I had to sneak around and kill that darn eye to get the most powerful relics, so that's probably how it should be. Oh, and speaking of that eye, it was kind of annoying to basically get a flashing middle finger from the game every now and then, but I don't think I really hate it. It gives you a warning so you can get into a safe location out of combat, and it's not like the timer from CH1 which can force resets because your tiny mistakes slowly added up over time, and it's not like the (presumably) fake warnings from CH2. It's threatening and annoying, but it doesn't ruin your game, which is exactly how these pressure thingies should be.


And that is it for my review of Dwarf Campaign! I'm aware that I've still written a ton even after separating the missions into two categories, but there's just simply too much material in these levels (it's kinda crazy how this campaign can give you more with 3 missions, than some others could with like, 7 or 8). And yeah, I did say that this is a 10/10, but don't worry, the campaign is still littered with annoyances, though I don't think it's enough to hit the "torture" threshold for anyone, really. It's just a really well crafted campaign (though number or gameplay mechanic changes would be welcome, as always) that will blow you away the first time, while still remaining interesting in the second and third. I'd recommend this to anyone who loves exploring maps in Warcraft 3, and to people who are looking for something that can kind of train their micro skills while still being fun and interesting. And to people who don't mind huge cliffhangers that never get a followup :ogre_hurrhurr:

Anyhow, thank you all for putting in the work and actually returning to voice this thing! That was a surprise to be sure, but a welcome one indeed. Wish you all a good day and night!
 
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Thank you for the huge review!

  • Tyrin is almost like the default Lich, except with the smart twist of his Frost Armor being swapped to the skeletal mage summoning thingy, which now allows him to use Dark Ritual much more consistently (it would be pretty tricky otherwise, since you're using mostly gnolls and dwarves). Though there's his ultimate, which is kind of... well, extremely overpowered in that map with all the high health pool enemies, so I would look into that. Oh, and I've had a weird bug with his W, where it just randomly turned off (either due to cinematics of saves). Yeah, that could have just been me turning it off and forgetting about it, but it happened way more than usual, so it's a little suspicious.

Summon skeletal mage can turn off automatically if you cast Death and Decay to prevent it from interrupting the ultimate.

If someone says "Dwarf Campaign" this is the map that immediately comes into my mind. I honestly this is one of the best maps out of all campaigns, and is the main reason why this thing got so popular.

Chapter 2: City of the Seven Mithril Golems is also our favorite, because of the story. However, some people like Chapter 3 or Chapter 1 more, so that's a personal preference.

Dwarf Campaign did not get Chapter 4, because it was impossible for us to create a new enjoyable story and a well playable chapter after 3 first chapters. There were too many loose ends and too many restrictions for the story after the first 3 chapters. And it was not enough to create a new chapter for the story, but it should also have to be playable without repeating the elements from the 3 previous chapters. So, we decided that we need a new fresh start that does not have so many constraints on our creativity, and we decided to create Gnoll Campaign Chapter 1. Its story has almost no restrictions on the story elements from the Dwarf Campaign, and it indeed turned out pretty nicely. Too bad Blizzard screwed it up with Warcraft III: Reforged and removed native support for custom campaigns, so the Gnoll Campaign never got Chapter 2.

Nevertheless, creating an interesting and well-playable chapter for a story-based campaign, such as the Dwarf Campaign or the Gnoll Campaign, is a big undertaking, taking at least 6 months of full work time, once you have come up with a good idea in the first place. And coming up with a good idea can take many months or years. For example, the Pixar Movies "Incredibles" and "Incredibles 2" have 14 years between their releases. So, I guess it was about 10 years that they needed to come up a good plot for the sequel. And it turned out quite nicely as well.
 
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Summon skeletal mage can turn off automatically if you cast Death and Decay to prevent it from interrupting the ultimate.

Wait, that can actually happen? Well, that's definitely a surprise since Frost Armor is also an auto cast that doesn't force the Lich out of his ultimate. This is kind of a band-aid fix that doesn't exactly deal with the issue (though it most definitely helps out the player immensely), but I don't blame you for doing that since fixing this sounds pretty tough.

I made a little mistake in the sentence you quoted second. I meant to say "I honestly think this is one of the best maps out of all campaigns, and is the main reason why this thing got so popular." Just wanna clear that up in case it confuses somebody.

Chapter 2: City of the Seven Mithril Golems is also our favorite, because of the story. However, some people like Chapter 3 or Chapter 1 more, so that's a personal preference.

What's interesting is that when I played this normally on a lower difficulty, I actually found the first mission the most fun. But it was a little too oppressive on very hard (not having sustain on heroes or units really hurt too), so my opinion shifted a bit.

Dwarf Campaign did not get Chapter 4, because it was impossible for us to create a new enjoyable story and a well playable chapter after 3 first chapters. There were too many loose ends and too many restrictions for the story after the first 3 chapters. And it was not enough to create a new chapter for the story, but it should also have to be playable without repeating the elements from the 3 previous chapters. So, we decided that we need a new fresh start that does not have so many constraints on our creativity, and we decided to create Gnoll Campaign Chapter 1. Its story has almost no restrictions on the story elements from the Dwarf Campaign, and it indeed turned out pretty nicely.

I definitely don't blame you for not making a fourth mission. Especially because the story is going in a direction where you'll be forced to do a giant macro mission with a fairly normal style (a bunch of bases constantly throwing attacks at the player), unless you somehow find a way around it, which doesn't sound easy. But you not only have to avoid that in order to keep what makes this campaign unique, but you also have to make it unique from the previous chapters. Focusing on making a campaign for gnolls instead was definitely the right choice, as there's a lot more you can actually do with them, both in terms of narrative and gameplay.
It's kind of ironic to say that when comparing dwarves and gnolls, huh?

Too bad Blizzard screwed it up with Warcraft III: Reforged and removed native support for custom campaigns, so the Gnoll Campaign never got Chapter 2.

Reforged though... yeah, there's not much I can say about that. Good thing there are still available download links for previous patches, so the community can still make and enjoy things that just wouldn't be possible on Reforged. The wasted potential is quite insane, though.

Nevertheless, creating an interesting and well-playable chapter for a story-based campaign, such as the Dwarf Campaign or the Gnoll Campaign, is a big undertaking, taking at least 6 months of full work time, once you have come up with a good idea in the first place. And coming up with a good idea can take many months or years. For example, the Pixar Movies "Incredibles" and "Incredibles 2" have 14 years between their releases. So, I guess it was about 10 years that they needed to come up a good plot for the sequel. And it turned out quite nicely as well.

Yeah, this is basically why I like to call games a form of art (and because in a way, it is just art that you interact with). Their quality is somewhat based on the experience and talent of the creators, but it's mostly based on the time people spent actually creating it. And in order for art to be good, the difference between the time the creators took to make it has to be at least a few thousand times bigger than the time where the consumers are actually enjoying the product, which is kind of crazy when you think about it.

And I know that I mentioned the short length of the campaign quite a bit, but I genuinely don't mind it. I'd rather have these 3 amazing maps than 6 rushed ones. This is also why I don't really like seeing people complain about how it takes forever for an episode from a series or a video from a YouTube channel to come out. Having to wait a lot doesn't feel nice, but the people producing their art are actually working hard to make it great during that entire time, and they're not just sitting back doing nothing (if they would, then that's just called "taking or break" or "quitting", and they would probably inform their fanbase about that).



Edit: Oh, and in the review, I kind of forgot to mention that the Emerald Nightmare fight in CH3 felt like a little too much compared to everything else in this campaign, especially since that was a mid game boss fight. And no, I wasn't actually trying to kill the big boss itself, but the inquisitors are simply too close to it while they're also very tanky, and you have to burn through them while that thing is hitting you with his huge damage from a big range while you're also getting Polymorphed non stop (or whatever the faceless version of that spell is called). And I'm saying that the fight should be nerfed not because of me struggling with it, but because its difficulty doesn't really match with a lot of the other fights from the campaign (even though those are tough as well). And I noticed that Modi doesn't really have abilities (at least it looked like he didn't), and I wouldn't mind him getting the kit of the Priestess of the Moon or something, just so he feels a bit more helpful as a last resort in the defense.
 
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